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Astronomy and Science-related Book discussions

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#51 Guest99

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 05:24 AM

Difficult decision as I have so many

 

Solar (theory or observational)

Rebel Sun by Colin Stuart, very readable and comprehensive overview of our understanding of how our sun works and what we can see on it.

       

Lunar (atlas, observational guide etc.)

Guide to the Moon by Patrick Moore, first book I got on astronomy

The Moon and how observe it by Peter Grego, what to see with various apertures and very interesting descriptions, one of the best guides I've come across

Lunar Atlas HP Wilkins published by Royal Observatory Greenwich, well this is certainly a challenge to use as it's so cluttered.

 

Planetary (whole solar system guide, individual planet history or spacecraft-related, observational guide etc)

The Planet Neptune by Patrick Moore, in depth assessment on the events leading up to and after the discovery of Neptune

Guide to the Planets by Patrick Moore, so many memories from the 30 years I knew him

 

Stellar (non-cosmology: star guide/atlas, individual star/nebula related, stellar evolution etc...)

Catalogue of the Universe by Paul Murdin, amazing pictures and bought just before I met Patrick for the first time, he kindly signed it even though he didn't write it

Jumbo star atlas, spiral bound and very useful when observing

Messier Objects by Stephen O'Meara, beautiful drawings and wonderful descriptions, his writing style is certainly engaging

The Caldwell objects by  Martin Moberly, very useful guide with excellent descriptions and recommended equipment on how to observe and image them

                        

Historical

The Astronomy of Burr Castle by Patrick Moore, absorbing account of Lord Rosse and his unusual telescope

On Stonehenge by Fred Hoyle, though provoking account of how Stonehenge could have been used as an observatory predicting eclipses etc., math's are at the back for those inclined.

 

University/College textbooks

The Moon our sister planet by Peter Cadogan, interesting analysis of the Apollo moon rocks by Peter who turned his doctorate thesis into a book.

 

 ANY other books you just CANNOT be without

Sky At Night, I've managed after many years to get all of them, brings back memories when the program was watchable

1999 Solar eclipse signed by Patrick Moore, memories of a visit to Farthings

Remastered Hatfield Lunar atlas by Jeremey Cook, useful when browsing through the ALPO/BAA TLP schedule

21st Century Atlas of the Moon by Charles Wood, my goto atlas for things lunar along with Peter Grego's book


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#52 Physicsman

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 06:48 AM

Brent, Daryl, Yuzameh, great lists - and no doubt there'll be further additions!

 

For example, HOW could I have forgotten to put Luna Cognita into my Lunar choices?

 

I know I only bought the set in January, but as Brent says, it has quickly become a favourite.

 

I guess I've opened a can of worms here, but that's exactly my intention. So many wonderful books with so many memories. And, of course, other people's lists provide temptation to acquire some of the items they rate very highly. I'm already adding to my "wanted" list!!


Edited by Physicsman, 08 March 2023 - 07:28 AM.

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#53 Guest99

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 07:17 AM

Yes I did forget a few

 

Historical

The Victorian Amateur astronomer by Dr Alan Chapman, written in his usual entertaining style and transports us back to an age where if you wanted a telescope you built it or had loads of money pay someone else to do it. Self taught and mostly of independent means but also the struggles of the 'ordinary' person who pursued an interest in the universe. Very interesting for those who like the history of astronomy. I've met Alan on many occasions and he writes as he speaks a very nice chap who is a pleasure to meet.

 

ANY other books you just CANNOT be without

The Jodrell bank telescopes by Sir Bernard Lovell, just after he retired I had the opportunity to visit Jodrell bank with a couple of friends, to my surprise I had a guided tour by Sir Bernard and after lunch with him in his huge office. Priceless memories and the book is a fascinating story of the difficulties he had to overcome.

 

Fred Hoyle a lifetime in science by Simon Mitton, fascinating story of Fred's life and his battles with basically everyone in science, he certainly thought outside the box, also his passion for hill walking. Very interesting, by no means a rose coloured story but a thoughtful and in depth study of a remarkable scientist.


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#54 Physicsman

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 07:34 AM

I think we'll all be "forgetting a few" for a little while - easy to do, and the fact that so many books have already been suggested indicates how well-served we are in this "hobby".

 

Btw, can anyone recommend a book that focuses on the great telescopes operating in the Chilean Andes, for example at Paranal?

I'd love to catch-up with the fast-paced developments down there.


Edited by Physicsman, 08 March 2023 - 07:35 AM.


#55 BrentKnight

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 08:24 AM

Daryl,

 

I'm looking for The Astronomy of Burr Castle now.  Thanks for the reference...

 

I believe Wolfgang Steinicke is also working on a book about Lord Rosse (William Parsons).  Probably similar to his recent book on Herschel.


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#56 Guest99

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 09:01 AM

Daryl,

 

I'm looking for The Astronomy of Burr Castle now.  Thanks for the reference...

 

I believe Wolfgang Steinicke is also working on a book about Lord Rosse (William Parsons).  Probably similar to his recent book on Herschel.

Not sure if it is still in print but it's a small book packed with information and interesting pictures, there was a lot more to the history of Burr castle than I realised, it also covers the time after the 3rd earl which is equally fascinating. I've read it several times and brings back memories.



#57 Guest99

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 12:56 PM

One historical book I have found fascinating is The astronomical telescopes of Southern Africa by Patrick Moore, took me a while to get hold of a copy, it takes their history from John Herschel to the 80's. He mentions some observatories I'd not come across and the problems with financing the observatories faced resulting in sadly some closures and consolidation. Lavishly illustrated with some interesting photographs taken by Patrick, towards the end it's a bit depressing reading of how so many fine observatories have fallen on hard times.

 

When I'm looking for inspiration for something to observe I pick up Deep Sky Wonders by Sue French, she writes very well and describes what she has seen and with what type of telescope unlike a lot of authors who describe what they think they see. big book packed with hundreds of objects both common and off the beaten track for binoculars and small telescopes



#58 yuzameh

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 03:36 PM

As I've said before, I've binned some older and more juvenille astronomy books in my time, plus old popular science paperbacks in general.

 

However, when it comes to Astronomy there are three books that have always survived, no matter how old and tatty, and that never get looked at, that aren't the usual big name titles.

 

In fact I've never really heard anyone mention them.

 

The oldest one is probably most well known - Universe From Your Backyard by Eicher - looks to be CUP

 

Star-Hopping by Garfinkle, a much underrated book, ideal serious beginner's book too.

 

The Constellations by Motz and Nathanson - not much in it that you won't found elsewhere, but it is all in one book and I've always had a liking for it.

 

Star-Hopping and The Constellations I've most likely always had a softspot for because their authors obviously put in a lot of work and research!

 

Backyard probably only got kept for the large colour photographs from those mostly preCCD days.

 

 

PS I missed out Wynn-Williams Fullness of Space in my earlier list, being one not mentioned so far.


Edited by yuzameh, 08 March 2023 - 03:37 PM.


#59 yuzameh

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 03:54 PM

Let's do some sciencey stuff now for a change :-

 

I followed all the Stephen J Gould series, which declined in topic over the years, but finally gave them away to someone else who had some in the series, they was too much philosophy and politics and going on about humans rather than his core subject near the end.

 

There's Conway-Morris's Crucible of Creation and also a book by someone else called The Garden of Ediacra (Gould's book on the Cambrian Explosion was given away)

 

It seems quite a few particle physics and cosmology books, of some vintage, hit the bin, as did some old astrophysics books from Harvard University Press and Freeman publishing (latter a compilation of scientific american articles or something called New Frontiers in Astronomy I think, well, new in 1975), the evolutionary threory books, surprisingly on reflection a penguin one by Maynard-Smith, and the handful of popular literature maths books such as by Martin Rees or that book on Nothing by a famous popular author, British cosmologist I think, whose name I can never remember but wrote several popular science and maths books.  The only book that's mathematical I've kept is the truly sideways "The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers".  Weird idea, but it works.  Apparently 220 and 284 are the first and smallest pair of amicable numbers, whatever they are, for instance!  That was just from opening the book at random.

 

Actually, it looks as though I went OCD in a clear out at some point as most of the popular and a bit deeper other science books I'd never read again went to the pulp mills, with mostly only the natur field guides and the astronomy observing books being amongst the major survivors.

 

Obscure surviving titles include Scaling by Schmidt-Nielsen and Light and Color [sic] in the Outdoors by Mynnaert which I think would be of interest to most observational astronomers although it mostly concentrates on daytime stuff.

 

PS one I thought I still had was the fascinating "The Life that Lives on Man", trying reading that and looking at the pictures without scratching!


Edited by yuzameh, 08 March 2023 - 05:18 PM.


#60 obrazell

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 04:32 PM

Daryl,

 

I'm looking for The Astronomy of Burr Castle now.  Thanks for the reference...

 

I believe Wolfgang Steinicke is also working on a book about Lord Rosse (William Parsons).  Probably similar to his recent book on Herschel.

I talked to him about this and no he isn't. He did a section in a book about Lord Rosse here https://www.amazon.c...books,70&sr=1-6



#61 BrentKnight

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Posted 08 March 2023 - 08:28 PM

I talked to him about this and no he isn't. He did a section in a book about Lord Rosse here https://www.amazon.c...books,70&sr=1-6

I don't recall where I had heard that, but I still think that would be a great book...



#62 Alex65

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 02:58 AM

Recently I downloaded The Moon by Nieson from project Guttenberg, marvelous book, his descriptions and drawings are artwork in themselves, T G Elger's book is also open source along with his wonderful descriptions, however the map isn't included in the e reader version as that was apparently a pull out in his book. Its still found on Amazon as a reprint minus the map which has caused irritation. Old they may be, some ( most) of their ideas have been disproved, but the descriptions and drawings of lunar features are very interesting in themselves. I often go back to them after observing the Moon.

I have a modern reprint of The Moon by T.G.Elger. It doesn't have the map in it either. However, the late 1950s reprints of the map can be found on the likes of ebay from time to time. This has Elger's map as well as descriptions of the shown lunar features by Wilkins. 

 

IMG_4887.JPG

 

IMG_4889.JPG


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#63 Alex65

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 03:20 AM

It is always interesting to see Moore being mentioned so often as a national institution by all the British amateurs here. I never really got into him much, but I didn't grow up in the UK so didn't know about him until much later. 

 

The very first adult book on astronomy that I read, as a 14 year old just starting out, was The Amateur Astronomer's Handbook by James Muirden. It really got me interested in observing the Moon and planets and I used to take the book out of my local library quite often at the beginning. It was some time later before I read that he was actually a British author. 

 

IMG_4890.JPG

 

It seems to me that James Muirden has been largely forgotten by British amateurs, or perhaps they're blinded by their school girl crushes on Moore, but I always thought that he was a much better writer. Reading Mobberley's biographies on Moore I can see that Moore often felt threatened by Muirden and accused him of stealing his ideas. I do have some books by Muirden in my library, aimed for children and up to adults, and they all make, to me, better guides to amateur astronomy than most of Moore's work. I could say the same for the likes of Heather Couper. 

 

 


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#64 Alex65

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 04:40 AM

I am a simple star gazer, not an astronomer, so my library doesn't included 'serious' books. However, my selections for the categories would be:

 

Stella: - none, I don't own any books solely on the Sun.

 

Lunar: Observing The Moon, Gerald North

           Exploring The Moon Through Binoculars And Small Telescopes, Ernest H. Cherrington

           The Moon, Wilkins & Moore

           The Moon: An Observing Guide For Backyard Telescopes, Michael T. Kitt

           Amateur Astronomer's Photographic Lunar Atlas, Henry Hatfield

 

Planetary: Patrick Moore On Mars, Patrick Moore

 

Stellar: Burnham's Celestial Handbook (I - III), Robert Burnham Jr.

            Guideposts To The Stars, Leslie C. Peltier

 

Historical: Cosmos, Carl Sagan

                 Mapping And Naming The Moon, Ewen A. Whitaker

 

Uni / College: none, I don't own any. 


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#65 Physicsman

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 07:40 AM

Alex, interesting to see the Michael Kitt "bookazine" mentioned here. I had a copy in the 1990s - was it published by Kalmbach?

 

In a similar vein, BBC Sky at Night magazine brought out a similar production in 2016 "Patrick Moore's Guide to the Moon" ( though he was 4 years deceased by then) - an approx. 120 page magazine format guide. Highly recommended if you can get hold of a copy:

 

20230309_123318 rs.jpg


Edited by Physicsman, 09 March 2023 - 07:44 AM.

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#66 Physicsman

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 08:01 AM

It is always interesting to see Moore being mentioned so often as a national institution by all the British amateurs here. I never really got into him much, but I didn't grow up in the UK so didn't know about him until much later. 

 

The very first adult book on astronomy that I read, as a 14 year old just starting out, was The Amateur Astronomer's Handbook by James Muirden. It really got me interested in observing the Moon and planets and I used to take the book out of my local library quite often at the beginning. It was some time later before I read that he was actually a British author. 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_4890.JPG

 

It seems to me that James Muirden has been largely forgotten by British amateurs, or perhaps they're blinded by their school girl crushes on Moore, but I always thought that he was a much better writer. Reading Mobberley's biographies on Moore I can see that Moore often felt threatened by Muirden and accused him of stealing his ideas. I do have some books by Muirden in my library, aimed for children and up to adults, and they all make, to me, better guides to amateur astronomy than most of Moore's work. I could say the same for the likes of Heather Couper. 

 

I corresponded with Patrick from my first letters asking for advice on a first telescope to later, very intermittent postcards. I never visited his Selsey home, but met him on a couple of occasions in London. I think Daryl may have more to say about him.

 

Patrick had his faults - he was born in 1923 and had "old school" attitudes to many aspects of the world. But those are principally private matters. I never recall any of the (recent trend) "girl school crushes". He was an eccentric, obsessive, focused astronomer - and he probably inspired tens of thousands of people around the world to take up astronomy, via his long-running broadcasts and hundreds of books. He was generous to the point of almost living in squalor and, despite his sometimes narrow world view, a complete inspiration on any astronomical subject. Many Sky at Night programmes used low-tech demonstrations (often built by Eric Ilett) but with his effervescent presentation, they were infinitely better than all the modern CGI-user programmes that now saturate the media.

 

He was, in a true sense, a "national treasure" in the UK.

 

Now James Muirden didn't have the publisher or media "clout" of Patrick, due mostly to circumstances of chance. Muirden is also acknowledged as a very good writer - with a more precise style than Patrick. He was also a competitor, branded as one of Patrick's "serpents".

 

To give one example, tying-in with this thread, there is the classic Sky at Night from the early 70s with Michael Bentine (one of the Goons). Humorous, and set in Patrick's Selsey study. I DROOLED at the collection of books on show in the background, even though this was only a small sampling of the ten thousand or so books he had crammed into the house. Those images have stuck with me for 50 years and provided more inspiration than many, many later documentary series.

 

I hope this adds a bit of perspective to the man. We followed him because he was, quite simply, a total inspiration. 


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#67 BrentKnight

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 08:03 AM

It is always interesting to see Moore being mentioned so often as a national institution by all the British amateurs here. I never really got into him much, but I didn't grow up in the UK so didn't know about him until much later. 

 

The very first adult book on astronomy that I read, as a 14 year old just starting out, was The Amateur Astronomer's Handbook by James Muirden. It really got me interested in observing the Moon and planets and I used to take the book out of my local library quite often at the beginning. It was some time later before I read that he was actually a British author. 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_4890.JPG

 

It seems to me that James Muirden has been largely forgotten by British amateurs, or perhaps they're blinded by their school girl crushes on Moore, but I always thought that he was a much better writer. Reading Mobberley's biographies on Moore I can see that Moore often felt threatened by Muirden and accused him of stealing his ideas. I do have some books by Muirden in my library, aimed for children and up to adults, and they all make, to me, better guides to amateur astronomy than most of Moore's work. I could say the same for the likes of Heather Couper. 

I had no idea about the rivalry between Muirden and Moore.  I love books, and I love learning about my favorite authors...



#68 Physicsman

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 08:20 AM

Brent, get hold of the 2 Martin Mobberley biographies of Moore:

 

It Came from Outer Space wearing an RAF Blazer

 

Return to the Far Side of Planet Moore

 

Warts and all treatment by Mobberley - who is clearly completely obsessed by Patrick, one could almost say, unhealthily so. We all have our "dark side", but many such aspects of well known people are principally private issues.

 

In some respects, Patrick had a very insular and childish outlook on life, with narrow corridors of interest. He didn't like people moving into his "territory" and, from some perspectives, was dismissive of some of his rivals. As in many walks of life, rightly or wrongly, he was part of a "clique" of friends and didn't like disturbances in his "status quo".

 

BUT, the key thing is that he probably inspired more people to take up astronomy in the UK than all the others combined.

 

He mellowed as he got older (he may even have 80% accepted the impact theory of crater origin, having been an entrenched volcanic man) and some of his attitudes changed. But as an astronomer and enthusiastic person in the media he was second-to-none.


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#69 Alex65

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 08:53 AM

Alex, interesting to see the Michael Kitt "bookazine" mentioned here. I had a copy in the 1990s - was it published by Kalmbach?

 

In a similar vein, BBC Sky at Night magazine brought out a similar production in 2016 "Patrick Moore's Guide to the Moon" ( though he was 4 years deceased by then) - an approx. 120 page magazine format guide. Highly recommended if you can get hold of a copy:

 

attachicon.gif20230309_123318 rs.jpg

 

Yes, it is a Kalmbach published softback from about 1991. 

 

I don't have the Moon guide magazine though I do have the Sky at night one about Apollo 11 and the one about Patrick Moore. 

 

I corresponded with Patrick from my first letters asking for advice on a first telescope to later, very intermittent postcards. I never visited his Selsey home, but met him on a couple of occasions in London. I think Daryl may have more to say about him.

 

Patrick had his faults - he was born in 1923 and had "old school" attitudes to many aspects of the world. But those are principally private matters. I never recall any of the (recent trend) "girl school crushes". He was an eccentric, obsessive, focused astronomer - and he probably inspired tens of thousands of people around the world to take up astronomy, via his long-running broadcasts and hundreds of books. He was generous to the point of almost living in squalor and, despite his sometimes narrow world view, a complete inspiration on any astronomical subject. Many Sky at Night programmes used low-tech demonstrations (often built by Eric Ilett) but with his effervescent presentation, they were infinitely better than all the modern CGI-user programmes that now saturate the media.

 

He was, in a true sense, a "national treasure" in the UK.

 

Now James Muirden didn't have the publisher or media "clout" of Patrick, due mostly to circumstances of chance. Muirden is also acknowledged as a very good writer - with a more precise style than Patrick. He was also a competitor, branded as one of Patrick's "serpents".

 

To give one example, tying-in with this thread, there is the classic Sky at Night from the early 70s with Michael Bentine (one of the Goons). Humorous, and set in Patrick's Selsey study. I DROOLED at the collection of books on show in the background, even though this was only a small sampling of the ten thousand or so books he had crammed into the house. Those images have stuck with me for 50 years and provided more inspiration than many, many later documentary series.

 

I hope this adds a bit of perspective to the man. We followed him because he was, quite simply, a total inspiration. 

 

I can understand the reason that folk here like Patrick Moore as he did so much for British amateur astronomy, both on TV and in print. I'm not anti Moore, it is just that I didn't have him to 'guide' me as a kid, so to me he was just an old guy on the TV in a bad suit telling me that shooting stars weren't really stars. When I came to live in the UK he was already older then I am now (I'm in my late 50s). I did watch his Sky at Night TV show in the 1980s and 1990s, but by then he was getting on a bit. I do read his books and have over twenty books of his, including one signed copy (bought without realizing it was a signed copy). 

 

I have read both of Martin Mobberley's biographies on Patrick Moore, hence the schoolgirl crush allusion. I think you know where I'm coming from!! 

 

Would I have been classed as a serpent? Well, I don't believe in TLPs, lunar grid patterns nor that volcanoes created all the craters on the Moon. On top of that, I like Germans and I like women and I am an immigrant to this country!! On the other hand, I also like cats! 

 

Moore wrote many good books, for their time. However, it seems that other writers never got their dues. James Muirden and Heather Couper were two British writers on astronomy who wrote just as passionate, and even better, as Moore. Heather Couper also did very well as a presenter and I remember her TV series. 

 

So, yes, I do enjoy most of Patrick Moore's books but, no, don't send me an invite to his fan club. 


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#70 Physicsman

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 08:57 AM

Following up my comments about the Michael Bentine Sky at Night programme, the photo Brent posted the other day (bookshelves) and the glimpse of some of Alex's books (above), I wonder if anyone would care to show a picture of a shelf or two from their library?

 

It may be only me, but I really enjoy looking at pictures of people's studies and trying to see what they've got on their shelves.

 

Here's one for starters - I'll only add some more if others show interest in the idea....

 

20230309_135217 rs.jpg


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#71 Guest99

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 09:34 AM

Patrick's house was certainly interesting, his living room has three full sized xylophones and a piano, his study was crammed with books all in a chaotic jumble yet he could pick one out without a second thought. Back in 1999 after the eclipse he showed us his telescopes, Oscar his 12 inch he hadn't used for many years and showed signs of rust, his 8 3/4 in the hexagonal observatory he also hadn't sued for sometime but looked in good condition. His 15 inch in the oil drum was his pride and joy and was as good as he had it from Peter Sartory, his eyepieces were museum pieces and not everyone got on with them but I thought they were ok.  Dudley Fuller ( Fullerscopes) converted the top to rotate so the focuser was at a convenient position at all times, collimation was a nightmare and Dudley and his engineers spent 3-4 months trying to figure out a way to make the top with the focuser and secondary rotate and keep collimation. His 5 inch Cook refractor is a marvelous instrument, he sued it to project the Sun and it worked perfectly. His 3 inch refractor he kept in his living room and was highly polished.

 

I frequently bumped into him at BAA meetings, talks etc, he  nearly always hung around until everyone who wanted a chat or autograph had seen him, I usually took a book not necessarily written by him for him to sign as a memento. He was certainly eccentric but only to eager to help anyone interested in astronomy, his talks usually lasted anything from 1-2.5 hours depending on the subject plus questions.

 

He certainly had his faults but no one is perfect but he had boundless enthusiasm, his book on the history of astronomy like the Burr Castle one was very well researched, his book on Neptune contains many citations which are largely ignored in most books on the subject.

 

The late Heather Cooper was very nice and eager to encourage people, her parties after the Winchester weekend is the stuff of legend, drink always flowed freely. She and James Muirden were very good authors but always seemed to live under Patrick's shadow which is a pity as their books were very interesting.

 

Selsey seemed to have quite a few eccentrics like Reg Spry who wrote a small but interesting book on making a telescope who's mount was a half shaft from a Morris Minor. Still occasionally available second hand and comes from an age if you wanted it you built it. Phil Ringsdore another legendary BAA figure also live in the same small village, all sadly no longer with us.

 

I've got both the Mobberley books and yes he comes across as having a 'school girl crush' on Patrick, some of the stories in there are certainly true as in the words of the Welsh comedian Max Boyce 'I know cause I was there'. They give an interesting insight into one of astronomy's characters, he certainly got thousands of people interested in astronomy even if some of his ideas were frankly bonkers. 



#72 Guest99

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 09:43 AM

I forgot to add when Lutterworth press went bust all Patrick's manuscripts weren't returned to him by the administrators, so he had to write them all over again on one of his ( he had 4) Woodstock typewriters using copes he had in his bookshelves which were everywhere in his house.

 

His cark called The Ark is now currently preserved in ruining order by Rother Valley Optics, when I saw it at Patrick's house I wondered how it managed to pass an MOT, as for cleaning well isn't that what rain is for!



#73 rockethead26

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 10:23 AM

Following up my comments about the Michael Bentine Sky at Night programme, the photo Brent posted the other day (bookshelves) and the glimpse of some of Alex's books (above), I wonder if anyone would care to show a picture of a shelf or two from their library?

 

It may be only me, but I really enjoy looking at pictures of people's studies and trying to see what they've got on their shelves.

 

Here's one for starters - I'll only add some more if others show interest in the idea....

 

attachicon.gif20230309_135217 rs.jpg

There is already a thread called "Show us your astro bookshelf" here.


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#74 BrentKnight

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 10:46 AM

There is already a thread called "Show us your astro bookshelf" here.

You beat me to it...


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#75 Physicsman

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Posted 09 March 2023 - 11:09 AM

Thanks guys, that was a thread I'd missed owing to my ignorance!

 

I'll have an enjoyable browse on there and maybe contribute a pic of two. :-)




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