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#1 Zygmo

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Posted 18 June 2023 - 01:03 PM

Solar Eclipse Event In Most Of Our Lives!! Almost FIVE minutes where I live! Unbelievable! (of course, where I live it is usually at least partly cloudy at that time of the day in that month)
But anyway....I need some advice. Lots of advice!!  LOL   I am going to set up a C8/or AR5 to run automatically throughout the show with my Nikon dSLR. My Lumix dSLR can also be pointed towards the sun without a filter, so I may mount it on the scope to record at the same time with automatic daylight settings.  AND I want to just look around of course taking pictures with the phone camera. Has anyone checked on where Mercury will be at that time?
So. Question one. If I set my shuttter speed on the dSLR shooting through a solar filter on the C8 that works for the sun before the eclipse...do you think I wil need to change it during the eclipse?  I will be taking images on both cameras till near totality, then video though the eclipse.
Will solar flares around the circumference be visible during totality?
I will be doing some timed practice runs between now and then.
Anyone else making plans yet? I have been told that here in Arkansas all the over-night places are booking (and booked!) up already. Favorite places...Mt Magazine, Petit Jean Mountain, and camping/trailer parks same thing. People are coming from all over the world.



#2 TxStars

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Posted 18 June 2023 - 05:19 PM

For imaging the eclipse you may want to read up on how to do it.

There are plenty of books and videos that can help you decide what to do.

A good PDF book would be this : 

https://www.amazingsky.com/EclipseBook

 

 

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#3 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 06:36 PM

Solar Eclipse Event In Most Of Our Lives!! Almost FIVE minutes where I live! Unbelievable! (of course, where I live it is usually at least partly cloudy at that time of the day in that month)
But anyway....I need some advice. Lots of advice!!  LOL   I am going to set up a C8/or AR5 to run automatically throughout the show with my Nikon dSLR. My Lumix dSLR can also be pointed towards the sun without a filter, so I may mount it on the scope to record at the same time with automatic daylight settings.  AND I want to just look around of course taking pictures with the phone camera. Has anyone checked on where Mercury will be at that time?
So. Question one. If I set my shuttter speed on the dSLR shooting through a solar filter on the C8 that works for the sun before the eclipse...do you think I wil need to change it during the eclipse?  I will be taking images on both cameras till near totality, then video though the eclipse.
Will solar flares around the circumference be visible during totality?
I will be doing some timed practice runs between now and then.
Anyone else making plans yet? I have been told that here in Arkansas all the over-night places are booking (and booked!) up already. Favorite places...Mt Magazine, Petit Jean Mountain, and camping/trailer parks same thing. People are coming from all over the world.

Wrong month.  The biggest Solar eclipse event is the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14!  If you can only see one eclipse in the next 12 months, that's the one you should see!  Are you going to New Mexico next week?



#4 winbag4

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 08:34 PM

Wrong month.  The biggest Solar eclipse event is the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14!  If you can only see one eclipse in the next 12 months, that's the one you should see!  Are you going to New Mexico next week?

?

 

The total eclipse in April is way bigger. Definitely more exciting than an annular, as well.



#5 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 08:37 PM

?

 

The total eclipse in April is way bigger. Definitely more exciting than an annular, as well.

I've never seen a Total Solar Eclipse so I am excited enough already about the Annular Solar Eclipse instead!

 

The main difference is that if you miss the Total Solar Eclpse in April 2024, you have a shorter wait time until the next Total Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Whereas if you miss the Annular Solar Eclipse in October 2023, you have a longer wait time until the next Annular Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Annular Solar Eclipses are much more difficult to observe than Total Solar Eclipses, so if you can only see one Solar eclipse in the next 12 months, it should be the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14.



#6 winbag4

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 08:49 PM

I've never seen a Total Solar Eclipse so I am excited enough already about the Annular Solar Eclipse instead!

 

The main difference is that if you miss the Total Solar Eclpse in April 2024, you have a shorter wait time until the next Total Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Whereas if you miss the Annular Solar Eclipse in October 2023, you have a longer wait time until the next Annular Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Annular Solar Eclipses are much more difficult to observe than Total Solar Eclipses, so if you can only see one Solar eclipse in the next 12 months, it should be the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14.

Since you've never seen a total eclipse, you're in for a huge surprise. It is one of the most amazing things you will ever see. Hopefully you are able to see the one in April. When you do, you'll understand why pretty much everyone would rather see a total eclipse than an annular one. Hopefully we all get to see both!


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#7 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 11:03 PM

I've never seen a Total Solar Eclipse so I am excited enough already about the Annular Solar Eclipse instead!

 

The main difference is that if you miss the Total Solar Eclpse in April 2024, you have a shorter wait time until the next Total Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Whereas if you miss the Annular Solar Eclipse in October 2023, you have a longer wait time until the next Annular Solar Eclipse in the Contiguous USA.  Annular Solar Eclipses are much more difficult to observe than Total Solar Eclipses, so if you can only see one Solar eclipse in the next 12 months, it should be the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14.

To each his/her own, but you are literally the only person that I have ever heard or read say that an annular eclipse is remotely at the same level as a total solar eclipse. For decades I said that an annular eclipse was worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see while a total solar eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see.

 

After having seen ten totalities, I still believe that a total eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see, and I intend to travel to every total eclipse in the few years that I have left: 2024 in North America of course, and am already booked for 2026 in Iceland and 2027 in Egypt, and will go to 2028 in Australia and 2030 in Botswana if I live so long.

 

But after having seen two annular eclipses I would no longer say that they are worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see. We will be driving 500 miles (each way) to see this month's annular eclipse near Bend, Oregon, and I am conflicted about whether I would drive another 300 to 500 miles further if the weather in Oregon requires a last minute move to Nevada. (But you will enjoy seeing the Southwest for the first time, so that justifies your long trip.)

 

But there is no doubt whatsoever about my mobility for the April total eclipse -- I will drive wherever the weather requires and be somewhere between Texas and New Brunswick on eclipse day, after driving as long and hard as necessary. I have a cabin paid for in San Antonio, and relatives in Indianapolis and New Brunswick. If weather sends me somewhere else for totality, well, I have slept in a car (a little MGA) all the way from Halifax to Los Angeles to Vancouver (I was a lot younger), and numerous other nights since.


Edited by Alan D. Whitman, 04 October 2023 - 11:25 PM.


#8 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 04 October 2023 - 11:54 PM

To each his/her own, but you are literally the only person that I have ever heard or read say that an annular eclipse is remotely at the same level as a total solar eclipse. For decades I said that an annular eclipse was worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see while a total solar eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see.

 

After having seen ten totalities, I still believe that a total eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see, and I intend to travel to every total eclipse in the few years that I have left: 2024 in North America of course, and am already booked for 2026 in Iceland and 2027 in Egypt, and will go to 2028 in Australia and 2030 in Botswana if I live so long.

 

But after having seen two annular eclipses I would no longer say that they are worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see. We will be driving 500 miles (each way) to see this month's annular eclipse near Bend, Oregon, and I am conflicted about whether I would drive another 300 to 500 miles further if the weather in Oregon requires a last minute move to Nevada. (But you will enjoy seeing the Southwest for the first time, so that justifies your long trip.)

 

But there is no doubt whatsoever about my mobility for the April total eclipse -- I will drive wherever the weather requires and be somewhere between Texas and New Brunswick on eclipse day, after driving as long and hard as necessary. I have a cabin paid for in San Antonio, and relatives in Indianapolis and New Brunswick. If weather sends me somewhere else for totality, well, I have slept in a car (a little MGA) all the way from Halifax to Los Angeles to Vancouver (I was a lot younger), and numerous other nights since.

Not any annular Solar eclipse, but this specific Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14 of 2023, specifically for observers in the Contiguous USA....

 

How important or "big" the event is should be proportional to its rarity.  For example, the November 2019 Mercury Transit of Sol was a much "bigger" and more important event to see than either the October 2023 Annular Solar Eclpse or the April 2024 Total Solar Eclipse.  I have to use the quotation marks there because Mercury is actually much smaller than Luna in apparent size.

 

Annular Solar eclipses are more common than total Solar eclipses because the average angular size of Luna is smaller than the average angular size of Sol.  However, the usable eclipse path for an annular Solar eclipse is much smaller than that for a total Solar eclipse, so it is much more difficult to find observing sites for an annular Solar eclipse than for a total Solar eclipse.  I posted about this on another thread here in Cloudy Nights, but airlines are NOT RESPONSIBLE for any damage or loss to electronic or photographic equipment (at least American Airlines isn't).  This means that (unless you can take a train) you either have to drive to the eclipse location or ship your gear in advance with shipping insurance.  There are also additional considerations such that international borders can be closed at any time due to changes in international relations or world events as happened for the June 2021 Annular Solar Eclipse.  So the only practical eclipse observing region where you should be guaranteed access to eclipse observing sites is within driving distance of a single country if you can't bring your equipment on an airplane and borders can close.  Looking at this specific region, then the October 2023 Annular Solar Eclipse is a more important (i.e. "bigger") observing event than the April 2024 Total Solar Eclipse, because at least over the next few decades, it will be easier to see Solar totality than Solar annularity in the Contiguous USA.  Thus if you can only see one eclipse in the next 12 months, you should prioritize the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14 --- assuming that your life expectancy is within range of the next total Solar eclipse (so there is an age/health consideration).  Ideally you should go to see both!!


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 05 October 2023 - 12:05 AM.


#9 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 01:28 AM

To each his/her own, but you are literally the only person that I have ever heard or read say that an annular eclipse is remotely at the same level as a total solar eclipse. For decades I said that an annular eclipse was worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see while a total solar eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see.

 

After having seen ten totalities, I still believe that a total eclipse is worth traveling to anywhere in the world to see, and I intend to travel to every total eclipse in the few years that I have left: 2024 in North America of course, and am already booked for 2026 in Iceland and 2027 in Egypt, and will go to 2028 in Australia and 2030 in Botswana if I live so long.

 

But after having seen two annular eclipses I would no longer say that they are worth traveling to anywhere in North America to see. We will be driving 500 miles (each way) to see this month's annular eclipse near Bend, Oregon, and I am conflicted about whether I would drive another 300 to 500 miles further if the weather in Oregon requires a last minute move to Nevada. (But you will enjoy seeing the Southwest for the first time, so that justifies your long trip.)

 

But there is no doubt whatsoever about my mobility for the April total eclipse -- I will drive wherever the weather requires and be somewhere between Texas and New Brunswick on eclipse day, after driving as long and hard as necessary. I have a cabin paid for in San Antonio, and relatives in Indianapolis and New Brunswick. If weather sends me somewhere else for totality, well, I have slept in a car (a little MGA) all the way from Halifax to Los Angeles to Vancouver (I was a lot younger), and numerous other nights since.

I think part of the problem is people who consider an annular Solar eclipse to be equivalent to a partial Solar eclipse as compared to a total Solar eclipse.  This is a common mistake.  An annular Solar eclipse and a total Solar eclipse are both full or complete Solar eclipses that have a partial eclipse phase, a full eclipse phase with either annularity or totality, and then another partial eclipse phase.  In other words, annular Solar eclipses and total Solar eclipses are two very different and distinct astronomical events.  You can't really say that one is "better" than the other --- they are just different.  If you're a serious eclipse chaser, you have to complete the trifecta: at least one partial Solar eclipse, at least one annular Solar eclipse, and at least one total Solar eclipse, within your lifetime.  If the goal is to see at least one of each type of Solar eclipse event within a lifetime, then again the Annular Solar Eclipse on October 14 should take priority because it will be much more difficult to see Solar annularity again within a lifetime than it will be to see Solar totality, at least for observers in the Contiguous USA.

 

--- If you are lucky enough to get into a hybrid eclipse path, you could try to see partiality, annularity, and totality all in a single day and then you're set for life.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 05 October 2023 - 01:34 AM.


#10 bunyon

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 09:20 AM

I've seen both and, with respect, there is no contest. You cite rarity. Rarity might (does) make an annular better than a partial. I'm personally spending a fair amount of time and money to see the October eclipse.

 

I would drive a few hundred miles every single day to see a total. I would pay a lot of money every day to see a total. They aren't great because they're rare. They're otherworldly experiences. Like, seriously, if they happened somewhere on the planet every day, a lot of us would go broke and probably die of exhaustion traveling to all of them. 

 

I hate to build it up too much for you and hope you see the TSE in April. Before 2017, I was fairly uninvested in TSEs as well. 

 

 

 

None of which is to take away from October. It will/should/hopefully be great. I'm really looking forward to it. No reason to fight over which silver dollar is shiniest. 


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#11 bunyon

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 09:45 AM

I should add, I do have a friend who traveled far for the 2017 TSE who came away relatively unimpressed. He liked it but said he'd never travel for one again. And he thinks I'm nuts for going so far for an annular. As Nicole said, a lot of people just aren't into them.

 

I would believe someone could be more impressed with an annular than a total and everyone's mileage varies!). But they will be a distinct minority.



#12 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 09:51 AM

How important or "big" the event is should be proportional to its rarity.  For example, the November 2019 Mercury Transit of Sol was a much "bigger" and more important event to see than either the October 2023 Annular Solar Eclpse or the April 2024 Total Solar Eclipse.

 

There are also additional considerations such that international borders can be closed at any time due to changes in international relations or world events as happened for the June 2021 Annular Solar Eclipse.  So the only practical eclipse observing region where you should be guaranteed access to eclipse observing sites is within driving distance of a single country if you can't bring your equipment on an airplane and borders can close. 

There is nothing rare about a transit of Mercury. They occur regularly, about 13 or 14 per century. I have seen two from my backyard. And I would not bother chasing 20 miles in my car to see another transit of Mercury whereas I travel the world to see total solar eclipses. But I certainly encourage you to experience the annular eclipse. Eclipse-chasing is not only about seeing the eclipse. It is also about experiencing somewhere that you have not seen before, as you will on your trip to the Southwest.

 

You have a valid point about borders potentially closing. Covid did not just close the USA-Canada border during the June, 2021 annular eclipse. The province of Manitoba closed its borders to other Canadians (completely against the Canadian constitution), and that prevented us from driving to Thunder Bay, Ontario where we had a charter flight scheduled for the annular eclipse. I had not driven anywhere for so long that I wanted to drive my then new Mustang halfway across the continent, even for an annular eclipse.


Edited by Alan D. Whitman, 05 October 2023 - 10:42 AM.

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#13 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 05 October 2023 - 09:59 AM

 If you're a serious eclipse chaser, you have to complete the trifecta: at least one partial Solar eclipse, at least one annular Solar eclipse, and at least one total Solar eclipse, within your lifetime.

If you are a serious eclipse chaser you will find that you have not completed it by seeing one total solar eclipse. You will want to see another and another. There are umbraphiles who have seen 30 totalities and still want desperately to see another!

 

There are even a very few chasers who travel the world to see every annular eclipse on the other side of the world. And there was a college professor who travelled the world to see EVERY solar eclipse, even partials (not at his own expense, I don't think).

 

Again, eclipse-chasing is not only about seeing totality or annularity. That is the highlight of any eclipse trip, but seeing new countries is also part of it, and so you decide where to see totality not only by what the climatological weather chances are, but also on what country in the path you want to see. Eclipses have shown me part of Mexico in 1991, the Caribbean on an eclipse cruise in 1998, much of Turkey in 2006 (and London on the way home), a large part of China in 2009, the south Pacific on an eclipse cruise in 2012 (and large parts of New Zealand and Australia), Denmark in 2015 from where our eclipse charter jet over the North Atlantic departed (and much of Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France after totality), Chile in 2019 (and large parts of Argentina and Brazil, especially Iguassu Falls, after totality). My other three totalities (1963, 1979, and 2017) were in North America, within a one or two-day drive or train trip.


Edited by Alan D. Whitman, 05 October 2023 - 01:18 PM.




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