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Convincing people to see the 2024 total solar eclipse

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#26 Look at the sky 101

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Posted 08 December 2023 - 07:26 PM

To be sincere, I’d prefer most people get motivated in fighting light pollution rather than on observing eclipses.
A total solar eclipse is wonderful but we’re talking of 10 minutes per century (for a given location) vs having low LP nights all year round for the whole century.

have you ever had the chance to see a total eclipse in your life?

 

ps: there are several eclipses in a century and the adventure lasts more than 10 minutes.
and what can we say about the memories that last a lifetime.

 

ps: il y a plusieurs éclipses dans un siècle et l'aventure dure plus que 10 minutes .

et que dires des souvenirs qui toute une vie .


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#27 edsmx5

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Posted 09 December 2023 - 02:44 AM


That's an entirely different matter, no? There's what, 36500+ days in a Century? Take one for the Eclipse, fight Light Pollution on the rest. It's an admirable endeavor, I just don't think this thread is the place for it.


I do agree on the problem, dont misunderstand me. Here's an article I just came across:

https://darksky.org/...ts-at-a-glance/

#28 Mike Q

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Posted 09 December 2023 - 09:08 PM

I will admit it, i dont find eclipses all that interesting.  This one i will find even less interesting because i live in Ohio, i am about 30 miles east of where it will pass directly overhead, and it is in April.  April in Ohio is a cloudy month, so we wont be able to see it anyway


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#29 Classic8

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Posted 06 February 2024 - 04:17 PM

I probably should have asked more people if they were going. Probably most of them think of a partial eclipse they saw and assume that a total eclipse is the same.

 

Chances are good I'll get clouded out anyway, but it's worth a shot.



#30 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 07 February 2024 - 06:00 AM

I probably should have asked more people if they were going. Probably most of them think of a partial eclipse they saw and assume that a total eclipse is the same.

 

Chances are good I'll get clouded out anyway, but it's worth a shot.

 

I am not going.. If it were close by and I could view somewhere where it was peaceful and not a zoo, I would consider it.

 

I had a coworker who was an eclipse chaser.  He would travel all over the world to see an eclipse.  That was all he did, never did any other astronomy.. 

 

I am just the opposite.  I observe every chance I get.  But solar eclipses have never attracted me the way they seem to attract others.. The SuperBowl is probably a good analogy.  I am interested in who wins but it's been 40 years since I watched the game.. It's a good time to do other things, the streets and stores are empty.  

 

Jon


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#31 jakabasej8

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Posted 15 February 2024 - 06:10 AM



Your first total eclipse is a wonderful event to witness. I will say that subsequent eclipses, if you are fortunate enough to experience others, both total and partial offer many subtle events happening in those precious  moments. Sharing equipment, manually operating cameras and trying to be a play by play announcer will greatly decrease your own eclipse adventure. During a partial eclipse one might notice, by chance,in the dappled shade of a near by maple tree a thousand pinhole camera images of the eclipse appearing and dancing around for those looking for it.

It is all good. https://www.viberate.com/

 

Grey

Absolutely! 



#32 jakabasej8

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Posted 19 March 2024 - 11:00 PM



I am not going.. If it were close by and I could view somewhere where it was peaceful and not a zoo, I would consider it. https://piktid.com/

 

I had a coworker who was an eclipse chaser.  He would travel all over the world to see an eclipse.  That was all he did, never did any other astronomy.. 

 

I am just the opposite.  I observe every chance I get.  But solar eclipses have never attracted me the way they seem to attract others.. The SuperBowl is probably a good analogy.  I am interested in who wins but it's been 40 years since I watched the game.. It's a good time to do other things, the streets and stores are empty.  

 

Jon

It's interesting to hear about your perspective on solar eclipses.


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#33 bunyon

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Posted 20 March 2024 - 08:39 AM

As with many, 2017 was life altering for me. I'd long wanted to see it due to my interest in astronomy. However, what struck me is that a total solar eclipse isn't, really, an astronomical event. It involves and touches so many senses that it felt entirely different than the many great astronomical sights I've been fortunate to see.

 

If you're extrapolating from partial eclipses you've seen, you're not "getting" what the experience of a TSE is.

 

On the other hand, I know several people who did see the TSE in 2017 and weren't moved as I was. They're a distinct minority, of course, but such people definitely exist. I think it's entirely likely that a lot of the people not motivated to see a TSE would fit in that group. Not all, but more than in the general population.

 

 

As with most evangelizing, there comes, quickly, a point where continuing to preach does more harm than good.. We live in a wonderful era, where most people interested in seeing a TSE can. Travel is easier, cheaper, and safer than ever before. Information about paths, hotels, navigation, etc. is more abundant than ever before. Weather forecasting is better. 

 

At this point, if someone (especially someone who can afford a suite of astronomical gear) doesn't see a TSE, it's a choice, and one I'm willing to respect. 


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#34 Nankins

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Posted 20 March 2024 - 11:57 AM

2017 changed me. We went to an eclipse talk by one of our local club members. That persuaded us to go to totality. It was amazing. Now we won't settle for partiality for this eclipse. We're actually at the same eclipse talk right now. I'm now a club member so I've been helping with it.
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#35 Classic8

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Posted 20 March 2024 - 03:50 PM

It's funny but one of the things I remember most about the eclipse was a slight change in the way the sky looked (the lighting quality, somehow) that must have been a good 20 minutes before totality. I wasn't expecting the changes just yet.

 

I'll probably have years to observe but this may be the last chance for me to see a total eclipse, and I'm driving several hours for it. I did see the 2017 eclipse so I at least have that. I'm not someone that will travel around the world to see one though.


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#36 Nankins

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Posted 28 March 2024 - 09:35 AM

Guess what?  Apparently all of the people we invited to come to the eclipse talk were just planning to stay at home that day.  Well, apparently afterwards all of them want to go to totality now!  According to my mom.... I was busy running a telescope and informing viewers about what they were seeing. 


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#37 kfiscus

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Posted 01 April 2024 - 10:50 PM

Guess what?  Apparently all of the people we invited to come to the eclipse talk were just planning to stay at home that day.  Well, apparently afterwards all of them want to go to totality now!  According to my mom.... I was busy running a telescope and informing viewers about what they were seeing. 

That means you did a good job.  Congrats.


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#38 No N in collimation

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Posted 08 April 2024 - 08:53 PM

It didn't take any special convincing today. I just set up and the crowd started forming. "Build it and they will come." 

 

 

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#39 Nankins

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 10:32 AM

I set up our club's solar telescope.  We went to a Purdue property thinking we would be by ourselves but the managers had had others asking to use the place as well, so there was a very small crowd.  Most hadn't seen a solar eclipse before other than one who had seen totality in 2017 and a few who had seen partiality in the 1990s.  I took the chance to do a little outreach. 


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#40 David Knisely

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Posted 10 April 2024 - 12:07 AM

bunyon posted:

 

As with many, 2017 was life altering for me.  . . (snip)  . . . On the other hand, I know several people who did see the TSE in 2017 and weren't moved as I was. They're a distinct minority, of course, but such people definitely exist.

 

Well, "life altering" would be:

1. Getting Married

2. Holding your first new-born child.

3. Getting fired from a job you have made your long-term career out of.

4. Having a life-threatening illness.

5. Death of a spouse or other loved one.

 

Experiencing a total solar eclipse?  Well, 2017's total eclipse was simply a stunning "once in a lifetime" experience for me, and definitely ranks as one of the top astronomical events I have experienced.  However, "life altering"??  Nope, not quite.  I think that a lot more people than you might think who have experienced totality are in the same boat as well, as they would consider it wonderful, but would probably pass on categorizing it as life changing or altering.   Those of us who feel this way aren't jaded or unemotional, but we do understand something of life as a whole, and some events or experiences in our short time on Earth definitely trump others.  Even among the various astronomical events I have experienced, a number of them rank right up there fairly close to totality, although totality is pretty close to the top.  I am still in wonder and awe of what I saw that day in 2017, but in life overall, the experience was mainly just one of many in my life.

 

For the 2017 event, I was contacted over two years earlier by local authorities and representatives to be on the committee planning our county's eclipse event.  I was more of the astronomical "consultant" or educator, as my main role would be putting on presentations or programs prior to the event as well as helping provide telescopes and operators on eclipse day.  However, I still had input and saw what was being done and how complex and difficult pulling the event off would be.  Still, on eclipse day, I was right in the middle of 15,000 people at Homestead National Monument experiencing totality for the first time despite the threat of clouds (which conveniently parted just as totality began).  I also experienced the problems of traffic, local access, higher-priced food vendors, and other event issues which, being a "local" myself, I knew how to deal with.  All things considered, I think our county did really well in making the event go relatively smoothly.  Not long after the eclipse stuff died down, I took a really hard look at 2024.  For totality this time, I would be driving at least 7 hours quite some distance into unknown territory, spending a lot of money, experiencing local traffic jams, and with no guarantee that clouds wouldn't spoil things.  I mulled it over in my mind for more than a couple of years before finally deciding that I was probably more needed here.  Hyde Observatory (Lincoln, Nebraska) is only a 43 minute drive for me, and being one of the observatory supervisors, we were planning on opening for the partial eclipse.  I wrote up the press release, did up the publicity a bit on Facebook and elsewhere, and opened up the facility on a beautifully clear and crisp April morning to about 1,200 people who came to Hyde for the eclipse.  You know what?  I had an absolute BALL doing it!   I guess that is the reason we all do outreach, isn't it?  Clear skies to you.

 

2024EclipseFrontLawnSmaller1.JPG


Edited by David Knisely, 10 April 2024 - 12:16 AM.

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#41 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 10 April 2024 - 01:41 AM

 

Well, "life altering" would be:

1. Getting Married

2. Holding your first new-born child.

3. Getting fired from a job you have made your long-term career out of.

4. Having a life-threatening illness.

5. Death of a spouse or other loved one.

:waytogo:

 

Jon



#42 Mike Q

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Posted 10 April 2024 - 03:52 AM

Since it rolled right over me here in Ohio I watched it start to finish.  It was an interesting experience.  Honestly I was more interested in how the animals reacted to it then anything.   The birds got confused, the bull frogs started doing their thing and our resident chipmunk headed to his hole.  When totality ended normal operations resumed.  

 

For me, it was interesting to watch but not something I wouldn't drive hours and hours to see.  For those of you that do, good on you.  


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#43 kfiscus

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Posted Yesterday, 06:19 PM

How 'bout a compromise "Life improving"?  I altered my life to make sure that I got to this one, fearing it might be my last.  (I treasure each of the four totals I've seen.)


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