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Upgrade from Saxon 1149EQ - 10" Dobsonian?

Observing Reflector Equipment
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#1 Biggusdoggus

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 05:43 PM

Hi,

 

My wife is an (avid) beginner, and bought a Saxon 1149EQ reflector a year or so ago. https://www.saxon.co...scope.html.html

She really enjoys using it - but TBH I think she's a bit disappointed with what she can see with it.

Mars, for example, is just a bigger blob, and while Saturn is admittedly a great sight, it's still like a little cartoon version - almost an emoji!

Not really in line with the description on the store website "a good introductory scope for lunar, planetary and bright nebulae viewing".

 

I think she was hoping to see nebulae, close ups of Saturn, that kind of thing.

 

My question is please - is this a decent upgrade? It is absolutely right at the top of our budget: https://telescopes.n...onian-telescope

 

Many thanks for any advice!



#2 ShaulaB

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 07:46 PM

It is important to know that the eyepiece view of an object is in no way similar to a photograph. People have seen so many Hubble and Webb pictures and are disappointed when what they view in their eyepieces does not match.

 

Mars goes through a cycle of when it is closest in its orbit to Earth. The next close approach will be in January of 2025! Right now, Mars is much farther away in its orbit. So an orange blob is all anyone will get. Just be patient and wait.

 

Her current scope is not able to magnify Saturn as much as a larger scope. More detail can be seen with a larger aperture (width of the main glass part).

 

Another law of optics states that the larger the aperture, the more photons of light will reach the eye. More photons mean you get a brighter image. Dim galaxies and nebulas that are barely detectable with your current scope will be much brighter and easier to see with more aperture.

 

Have you considered an 8 inch Dob? Lots of people have 8 inch reflectors as lifetime telescopes. An 8 inch will fit into almost any vehicle for trips to darker skies.


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#3 mrowlands

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 08:06 PM

Noting what ShaulaB said about expectations, the 10 inch dob you linked to will be a large upgrade in every way from the 4.5 inch newt.  Not only will the views be better, the scope will be much more stable.

 

Mike R.


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#4 Biggusdoggus

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 08:23 PM

It is important to know that the eyepiece view of an object is in no way similar to a photograph. People have seen so many Hubble and Webb pictures and are disappointed when what they view in their eyepieces does not match.

 

Mars goes through a cycle of when it is closest in its orbit to Earth. The next close approach will be in January of 2025! Right now, Mars is much farther away in its orbit. So an orange blob is all anyone will get. Just be patient and wait.

 

Her current scope is not able to magnify Saturn as much as a larger scope. More detail can be seen with a larger aperture (width of the main glass part).

 

Another law of optics states that the larger the aperture, the more photons of light will reach the eye. More photons mean you get a brighter image. Dim galaxies and nebulas that are barely detectable with your current scope will be much brighter and easier to see with more aperture.

 

Have you considered an 8 inch Dob? Lots of people have 8 inch reflectors as lifetime telescopes. An 8 inch will fit into almost any vehicle for trips to darker skies.

 

 

Thanks ShaulaB.

Can I assume from what you're saying that you think a 10" could be a bit of an overkill at this point?
An 8" is $300 (NZ) less: https://telescopes.n...onian-telescope


Edited by Biggusdoggus, 14 September 2023 - 08:23 PM.


#5 Biggusdoggus

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 08:24 PM

Noting what ShaulaB said about expectations, the 10 inch dob you linked to will be a large upgrade in every way from the 4.5 inch newt.  Not only will the views be better, the scope will be much more stable.

 

Mike R.

That's a good point about stability, Mike - the current scope is very shaky...



#6 ShaulaB

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 08:56 PM

No, a 10 inch is not overkill. Bigger aperture is always better. My point is, an 8 inch can satisfy your needs for now, and probably for the next few years, while saving some money.


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#7 Biggusdoggus

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Posted 14 September 2023 - 08:58 PM

No, a 10 inch is not overkill. Bigger aperture is always better. My point is, an 8 inch can satisfy your needs for now, and probably for the next few years, while saving some money.

Awesome - thank you for the advice.



#8 dmgriff

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Posted 15 September 2023 - 09:00 AM

Hi,

 

My wife is an (avid) beginner, and bought a Saxon 1149EQ reflector a year or so ago. https://www.saxon.co...scope.html.html

She really enjoys using it - but TBH I think she's a bit disappointed with what she can see with it.

Mars, for example, is just a bigger blob, and while Saturn is admittedly a great sight, it's still like a little cartoon version - almost an emoji!

Not really in line with the description on the store website "a good introductory scope for lunar, planetary and bright nebulae viewing".

 

I think she was hoping to see nebulae, close ups of Saturn, that kind of thing.

 

My question is please - is this a decent upgrade? It is absolutely right at the top of our budget: https://telescopes.n...onian-telescope

 

Many thanks for any advice!

I did exactly the same....went from a 114/900 newtonian on a eq1 to a 250/1250 dob.

 

Definitely a upgrade and not overkill. Lunar is akin to a fly over....

 

You will not be disappointed in my experience.

 

Good viewing,

 

Dave



#9 gpaunescu

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Posted 15 September 2023 - 09:35 AM

You have to consider the size of telescope. The one  you have I guess, is easy to take out and start observing.

The 10", is bigger, have to consider that you store in one place and the observing field is in another place; so that means you have to transport it.

If you cannot go to store to see it physically, how big it is, at least take the dimension and try to check if are suitable for you.

 

I'm agree, that bigger aperture is better, but also consider that the bigger aperture can remain unused, because of size and weight.

 

Also, another aspect: larger aperture, are need acclimatization of the mirror, specially if the difference between storage place and observing place temperatures is big.

For 10" acclimatization period could arrive to 1-2 hour. For 8" is shorter.

 

 

If you buy 8", with rest of money, may consider better eyepiece (flat field eyepieces, larger AFOV).



#10 truckerfromaustin

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Posted 22 September 2023 - 11:57 AM

+1 on the 8 inch dob. The money you save can be used for better eyepieces and accessories. The 10 inch is substantially larger, heavier, and more difficult to use than the 8 inch. It's the reason why the 8 inch dob is the most recommended scope for amateur astronomers. It's the best bang for your dollar.

Clear Skies,
Greg
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#11 Biggusdoggus

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Posted 23 September 2023 - 04:17 AM

Thanks Greg, appreciate the advice.

Edited by Biggusdoggus, 23 September 2023 - 04:19 AM.

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#12 luxo II

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Posted 23 September 2023 - 05:20 AM

... is this a decent upgrade? It is absolutely right at the top of our budget: https://telescopes.n...onian-telescope

Optically it is a very decent upgrade - it is quite capable of showing what your wife was hoping to see, but it won't be easy to use. I also use a 10", but on an equatorial GOTO mount.


Edited by luxo II, 23 September 2023 - 05:22 AM.


#13 JimMo

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Posted 23 September 2023 - 08:48 AM

Hi Biggusdoggus and welcome to CN.

 

Twenty years ago I went from a 4.5" Meade newt on a shaky GEM and tripod to a 10" Orion dob similar to the one you linked to and it was a huge upgrade. When observing the planets from my backyard I really noticed the larger view and lots more detail even with my inexpensive eyepieces. When storing the scope for a while I kept the optical tube assembly (OTA) in an Orion carrying and transport bag in my basement. More often I would also just leave the scope assembled in the garage with a large garbage bag over it to keep the dust off. I easily moved it to my patio observing area with a two wheel hand cart. You may need to modify the cart a bit, but with some padding and a bungee cord or two and you can wheel it anywhere you want.  

 

I appreciated the telescope even more when I took it to darker skies and the faint little smudges I saw in the smaller scope showed so much more detail. I didn't find that transporting the tube and base that difficult and they easily fit into a regular car, hatchback, or SUV. Dark skies and upgrading to modern wide-field eyepieces got me totally hooked and in 2006 I started to build my current 14.5" dob.


Edited by JimMo, 23 September 2023 - 09:22 AM.



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