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What did you see last night with your binoviewer?

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#26 Takuan

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Posted 19 December 2023 - 11:56 AM

Location: mountain pass at 1800 m (5900 ft)
Sqm-L at zenith: 21.2- 21.3.
Instrument: Dob 10" F5
Binoviewer: Linear (Omegon)
Eyepieces: 20 mm Sterling Plossl (62x; 0.8⁰) and Chinese Super Plossl 15 mm (83x; 0.6⁰). I had 12 ED for 104x but the seeing was not enough.

I start observing with the 20 mm Pl.

C 10/ NGC 659/ NGC 654. NGC 659 is the smallest and the one where I see the fewest stars. It is shaped like a closed crown or small circle. NGC 654 is bigger and I see quite a few more stars (~20). It is shaped like an inverted triangle. C10 is much more enjoyable: bigger, more and brighter stars.

I make an attempt, just in case, to see IC 10, the small galaxy between M31 and M33. Unsuccessfully. SB too low, I imagine.
To make up for it, I take a look at WZ, the carbon star. Is beautiful. In the finder (14x50) the bluish companion star (m 8.3) is very close, forming a charming pair.

NGC 7790-88. Not much for this aperture/ sky. A dozen stars, the first and 6-8 the second.

Carolina's Rose, impressive as always, tonight seems to me more like a brain in the dark. Curious...

The Perseus double cluster is too large for 0.8º. It fits in the FOV but too narrow for my taste. Although impressive, of course.

A look at NGC 1444. Just a handful of stars, but the brightest one (don't know if it belongs to the cluster) is a nice double. Actually, it's triple, but I didn't see the third one that night.

M35/ NGC 2188. The mother and the child. At 62x I see few stars in the son, but very concentrated.

M1 is easily seen in the finder. In the BW I can't see any detail that night, although I don't stay long either.

The Christmas tree cluster reminds me more of a bodybuilder with two dumbbells in his hands. Enormous.


At this point I switched to the 15mm Pls and left them on until the end of the night.


I see the dark band in M82 and the silhouette of a spiral arm in M81 (the other one was not clear to me).

C 7 was already visible in the finder. Little detail in the telescope. Another low SB galaxy.

Leo's triplet splendid. I saw mottling on the two Messiers, but I couldn't distinguish the dust lane from the NGC.

Recalling a thread on the Deep Sky forum, I took a look at Leo's second triplet. The weaker component required averted vision, but I saw it easily. A really nice image, although I'll stick with the "other" triplet.

M 67 is fine, but my mistake was, immediately afterwards, to go to the three Messiers of Auriga. Wow... My favorite M 37, reminded me a little of Caroline's Rose, with those dark lines, infiltrating between the stars like rivers of darkness...

I end the night with M51. It wasn't very high yet and my eyes were very tired at that time. The spiral arms were visible... but not clearly visible. You know what I mean. More magnification, more height above the horizon, and fresher eyes would have helped.

All night, I only removed the BWs to confirm M81 and M51. The truth is that the image gained something, although not much.

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Edited by Takuan, 19 December 2023 - 01:09 PM.

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#27 Brollen

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 09:37 AM

Two nights back, from my Baltimore condo balcony which faces east, I had untypically calm skies and good viewing conditions - excessive light pollution aside. I had placed my C8-A-XLT on the balcony much earlier, so it was well cooled and acclimated. On this C8 I use the metallic dew shield which Celestron offers - I have the same on my C6-A-XLT - I really like these dew shields and I don’t remove them. These shields do add some weight to the front end, but it is the perfect ballast to my Baader MK II binos and they are incredible shields of all the street/city light.

 

I had the C8 loaded on my SV M002C mount/pier, which is sitting on my carbon fiber Innorel tripod - a very stable and portable solution. I was using an older 1.25” Celestron prism diagonal (from Japan - very good diagonal!), the Baader MK II binos, the 1.25x GPC and alternating between Astro-Techs 25mm and 19mm PF EP pairs - 65 degree (!) well built comfortable EPs that provide excellent views.

 

I spent considerable time looking at Orion and all the wonders in this amazing constellation. M42 looked gorgeous with lots of nebulosity visible. I was able to see the E star in the Trapezium. Numerous star fields, binaries, etc., Rigel and later Sirius .. my never ending quest to see the Pup - no luck this night. I scanned NE’erly to catch M35 and then tried to see (unassisted by filters) the region having the Cone Nebula and Xmas Tree Cluster… filter needed!

 

The view through the cooled C8 surpassed my expectations for that night. I had tweaked collimation on it maybe 6-7 weeks back but hadn’t used it too much since then. The views two nights back were very good, with tight star images, inside and outside of focus patterns were identical, etc. The C8 is undeniably and quite simply, a light bucket with fainter stars and star fields popping out of the darkness.

 

The Baader MK II binos continue to utterly impress me. I now only bino-view, no more cyclops viewing as I find bino-viewing so comfortable and allowing me to seek details in a much more relaxed manner.

 

Clear skies!


Edited by Brollen, 04 January 2024 - 09:44 AM.

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#28 RAKing

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 03:13 PM

Nice report and I am glad you were able to get outside.  Here in Northern Virginia, we have been dealing with lots of clouds.

 

HINT - The best time to catch the "Pup" is at twilight.  If you wait until it's dark, the contrast of Sirius overpowers the view and it's much more difficult to see the tiny Pup in the glare.  Try to catch it right around sunset. 

 

Cheers,

 

Ron


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#29 Doug Culbertson

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 03:17 PM

Nice report and I am glad you were able to get outside.  Here in Northern Virginia, we have been dealing with lots of clouds.

 

HINT - The best time to catch the "Pup" is at twilight.  If you wait until it's dark, the contrast of Sirius overpowers the view and it's much more difficult to see the tiny Pup in the glare.  Try to catch it right around sunset. 

 

Cheers,

 

Ron

I never thought about that before. In 30+ years of observing I have ever successfully caught the Pup, and I've used apertures up to 18" trying. Maybe this year I'll give it another go once Sirius is up at sunset. 

 

Brollen, nice report! Like Ron, the weather has not been kind to me much this year, so it was nice to enjoy the night sky vicariously. 


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#30 RAKing

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 03:48 PM

I never thought about that before. In 30+ years of observing I have ever successfully caught the Pup, and I've used apertures up to 18" trying. Maybe this year I'll give it another go once Sirius is up at sunset. 

 

Doug,

 

Let me give you the rest of the clues!  Between now and 2030 is the best time to split the pair.  The first time I did it was in 2010 when they were closer together.  I used my C8-HD with the BV and a pair of old CZJ 12.5mm orthos and a 1.25x GPC.  It gave me 203x, but after I split it the first time, I have done it with 170x, too.

 

Like I said, twilight is the best time, and the clue is two field stars to the southwest of Sirius.  There stars are about mag. 9 and if you can see them, then you can see the Pup.  So I setup at twilight, move Sirius over to the eastern edge of the view, then watch for those field stars - they are just far enough away to protect your vision.  As soon as I can see them, I shift over to Sirius and hope the atmospheric conditions are stable enough for me to spot the Pup.

 

Best of luck!

 

Ron


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#31 Doug Culbertson

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 03:52 PM

Thanks Ron! I pretty well gave up on trying to see it several years ago, but maybe this year will be when I finally catch it. Honestly, it's just for bragging rights. lol.gif


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#32 Brollen

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 08:46 PM

Beta Monocerotis .. beautifully resolved as non-flaring balls of light using my SV90TBV, a 1.25” TV enhanced mirror diagonal, the Baader MB II bino, 2.6x GPC and a pair of 82 degree ES 11mm EPs. Incredible triple grouping of stars. Was also looking for the Pup around Sirius - no luck but I’m determined.

 

Earlier I had pulled out the Orion 80mm f/6.25 Eon along with the Stellarvue SV90TBV to compare their views - using same diagonal and MBII / EP pairs. The Eon is a fast 80 mm ED doublet, using FPL-53 glass. It definitely is capable of providing very nice views, especially with the MB II bino. These 2 scope views were similar, but the SV90TBV had better contrast, especially looking at M42. In general the SV90 also showed more - such as Rigel and its white dwarf companion. In the SV90 it was distinctly present. With the Eon, it was present but not so distinct and harder to see sometimes requiring averted vision.


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#33 Takuan

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Posted 18 April 2024 - 11:17 AM

Location: mountain pass at 2100 m (6889 ft)
Sqm-L at zenith: 21.3
Transparency: Regular (some Saharan dust in the air)
Instrument: 10" dob (Omegon Pro dob)
Binoviewer: Linear (Omegon)
Eyepieces: APM UFF 18 (69x; 0.8⁰) and ED 12 Omegon (104x; 0.6⁰).
Date April 14th

I start the night with the 18 UFF and M81/82. They are already somewhat low and the dust is noticeable in the atmosphere, since the dark band of M82 is not as evident as usual and I cannot see the glimpse of M81's arms. NGC 3077 easy and 2976 a bit more difficult.
Leo's triplet was spectacular, although a little less than what I'm used to. I would say that I sensed the dark band of NGC 3628 (not sure 100%).
I start my way towards the Markarian chain from Rho Virginis, and there I see NGC 4608/ 4596. Here the galaxy hopp begins.
M87, NGC 4478/ 4476 and I get to the famous face (in the Linear it is not inverted). This vision is fantastic.
Then NGC 4438, 4435, 4425, 4458, 4461, 4473, 4477, 4479, 4459 and 4474.
It took me 15 minutes to move along the chain, calmly and enjoying it.

Then I go to M88, 90 and 89. NGC 4564, the pair NGC 4568, M59, M60 and its neighbor, the small NGC 4647 and NGC 4638.

Near Vinidemiatrix I see a beautiful double star (m 6.9/ 9.4). According to Stellarium it is called HD 112278.
I resolve some stars in M53 with averted vision and in the place where NGC 5053 should be I would say that the background of the sky is somewhat clearer...
Another beautiful double close to this last globular HD 115404 (m6.6/ 8.8).
Another galaxy near the planetary LoTr 5 (stellar aspect) NGC 4725.
The star nucleus of M64 is downright beautiful. I don't stop to look for the dark band (it wasn't evident that night) and move on to NGC 4565. Although the image is beautiful at 69x, I switch to the 12 ED to get some detail. I see the dark band in the central part and the incredible gradient of light from the core to the outer parts.

That night the arms of M51 and M101 were not at all evident, so I moved on to something else...
I don't know how long I spent in a dreamlike state (it was already 4:15) with M13. Really speechless. M92 very resolved, it is much better than M13 from the city.
A quick view of M57 without filters, next to which I saw a 13.9 star, which was the faintest of the night.

M4 at 22º is not all it could be, but it seemed to me that it had spiral-type star arms... too many galaxies in one night, yes. smile.gif
Next to M4 I see NGC 6144 as an unresolved spot of light.

M11 is another of the gems of the night. It always seems more like an arrow to me than a flock of birds, but hey, we won't discuss that nonsense...
Last of the night NGC 6704 with some stars resolved.

I end the night with the 7x50 on the monopod navigating the Milky Way.

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Edited by Takuan, 19 April 2024 - 05:55 AM.

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#34 cahanc

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Posted 21 April 2024 - 06:45 PM

Last night I saw the moon using Denkmeier Super 27 with 19 Panoptics and it was amazing. I really enjoy the powerswitch function on these also.  It sure beats changing out eyepieces to get more or less magnification.  This is a quick pic I took with iPhone up to eyepiece. 

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Edited by cahanc, 22 April 2024 - 04:04 PM.

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