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Review of the 20” f/3.4 Reginato Supermaser

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26 replies to this topic

#1 davidefg

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 07:00 AM

It is difficult to find downsides for such a telescope. There are certainly some aspects that can be improved, as I pointed out in the review, but overall it is a jewel. The best proof is that since I have it I used the Takahashi four times: twice to compare it to the Supermaser and twice for observations with friends (one of them broke his leg and couldn’t reach the eyepiece with the Supermaser).

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#2 Jan-S

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 07:29 AM

Thanks! And a big congratulations! A Newtonian/Dobsonian that is solid and keeps collimation is such a rare treat. Plus, it looks gorgeous and the crafstmanship seems to show in everything. I am glad to learn about the possible customisations (Feather Touch focuser, specced-up optics). I presume a Nexus DSC could be used instead of the ArgoNavis, should one wish to do so - I have an unused one here. I would also consider getting the optics from a manufacturer I have happily ordered from before (Mirro-Sphere), just by force of habit. It would nevertheless be nice to see some test results of these Supermaser mirrors - chances are they are just as good. There is a 24 inch, but that seems to be a step/ladder scope, even for tall observers.



#3 davidefg

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 08:50 AM

Thank you! I confirm, it's really beautiful and well built. I'm sure that the Nexus DSC can be used. I recently met Silvano Reginato at a star party and he told me that he's also working on a new pointing system built around SkySafari, it seems really interesting and easy to use. I'm not sure about the optics, I think that the SuperMaser is not supplied without the optics. Yes, I can confirm that: the 24" and 28" models require a ladder or a few steps, I had the opportunity to see both at a star party. Have a great day, 

Davide 



#4 DFW Guy

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 10:30 AM

Is it possible for you to take some images to simulate what it's like to look through one of these beasts? Many of us will never get the chance to look through a beast like this in our lifetimes but it's always cool to see common targets like Andromeda and Orion? 



#5 davidefg

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 11:18 AM

Hi, I'm not able to take pictures with the SuperMaser because it'a manual telescope. I can try to describe a few common objects as seen from my garden, with a Bortle 3 to 4 sky. The Andromeda galaxy, for example, shows at first sight two very very prominent and long dust lanes in the direction of M110, with little effort NGC206 (I never saw it before). Probably many of its globular clusters are also visible, but I never searched them. Of course, even with the 21 mm Ethos I can see only a fraction of the entire galaxy because the field of view is always quite narrow (more or less 1°). M42 shows a tremendous amount of details, especially near the Trapezium and in the dusty region between M42 and M43 and even without filters shows quite clearly a delicate nuance of pink added to the usual bright green of the oxygen. The Horsehead nebula with an H-beta filter is really easy to see, but with little details (you can more or less discern the shape, but it's not very sharp nor easy to see). M16 definitely shows the pillars of creation and they are quite easy to see with a proper filter (even two of my friends, that were looking through a telescope probably for the second time could see something dark in the center of the nebula, but they weren't able to resolve the pillars). Generally reds are not visible in the nebulae, but the details are comparable to short exposures (60-120 seconds) taken with DSLRs. 



#6 TallTanBarbie

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 12:38 PM

Very nice telescope!  BTW, my father was in the military and stationed near a town in the US state of Georgia named after your location -- Aosta Valley -- Valdosta, GA.  Unlike Aosta, IT, Valdosta is in a flat plain surrounded by pine trees without a visible clear horizon.  You must have wonderful seeing conditions in the mountains.



#7 davidefg

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 02:34 PM

Thank you! I confirm, the Valle d’Aosta is quite different. In my region the seeing is quite variable, but sometimes I can push the SuperMaser to 600x, the maximum magnification that I can achieve with my eyepieces
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#8 davidefg

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Posted 01 December 2023 - 02:34 PM

Thank you! I confirm, the Valle d’Aosta is quite different. In my region the seeing is quite variable, but sometimes I can push the SuperMaser to 600x, the maximum magnification that I can achieve with my eyepieces

#9 AJW

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 02:06 PM

Congratulation & Thank you for your informative article and review.  Most enlightening.  I own a 10"Orion Go-to Dobson and can only imagine the fine, beautiful, and detail images you have with your 20" Supermaser.  Your analysis and explanations were extremely valuable.  Thank you again and "clear skies"



#10 davidefg

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 03:49 PM

Thank you very much for your feedback, I’m happy that you found my review interesting. Clear skies!

#11 Mariner13

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 05:52 AM

That's one hell of a beast you got there!! Thanks for the great review.

Clear skies and God bless.



#12 davidefg

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 09:32 AM

Thank you very much! It's really a beast, but a very beautiful one (and easy to use). Clear skies!



#13 Binofrac

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Posted 08 December 2023 - 06:14 AM

I'm really envious of your observing location. I always thought mine was quite good as it looks over the sea for a clear southern horizon, but it's nowhere near as nice as yours. 

 

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#14 davidefg

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Posted 08 December 2023 - 01:37 PM

I envy yours! Where I live the south is significantly obstructed by mountains although on the other hand seeing and transparency are often quite good



#15 Rick W Morgan

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Posted 12 December 2023 - 05:21 PM

That is an amazing article and telescope 🔭. Clear skies to you.

#16 davidefg

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Posted 13 December 2023 - 11:32 AM

Thank you very much! Clear skies



#17 pgrunwald

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Posted 16 December 2023 - 02:09 AM

Wonderful read,  thank you!

 

Have you seen PiFinder project here on Cloudy Nights? 

 

Clear Skies!



#18 sunrag

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Posted 16 December 2023 - 01:59 PM

Nice article. Congratulations on your acquisition!

 

The design does seem very different other large dobs. Lot of new things to think about (actually Serrurier truss design is not new, but seen only on large professional telescopes).

 

I watched the assembly video on Reginato website. It was not clear to me how the truss tubes were attached. It did seem like some kind of magnetic clamp rather than screw fasteners. Can you provide any information about the attachment mechanism?



#19 davidefg

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Posted 16 December 2023 - 02:34 PM

Wonderful read,  thank you!

 

Have you seen PiFinder project here on Cloudy Nights? 

 

Clear Skies!

Thank you for your feedback! It seems a really smart system! Argonavis is a good pointing system, but far from perfect (the catalogue of DSOs is quite limited for example). Clear skies!



#20 davidefg

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Posted 16 December 2023 - 02:43 PM

Nice article. Congratulations on your acquisition!

 

The design does seem very different other large dobs. Lot of new things to think about (actually Serrurier truss design is not new, but seen only on large professional telescopes).

 

I watched the assembly video on Reginato website. It was not clear to me how the truss tubes were attached. It did seem like some kind of magnetic clamp rather than screw fasteners. Can you provide any information about the attachment mechanism?

Thank you very much! My english is probably not good enough for such a specific question. I didn’t tear down the truss poles but I’m sure that it’s not magnetic. In my opinion it’s a spring-loaded mechanism. Clear skies!



#21 BobSoCal

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Posted 18 December 2023 - 09:05 PM

That's a crazy telescope. I'm already looking into flights from California to Turin. Do you have a guest room? My wife and I are very tidy. ;-)

 

PS: you could put a Celestron NexYZ on the eyepiece and snap a shot to share with all of us!



#22 davidefg

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Posted 19 December 2023 - 08:57 AM

That's a crazy telescope. I'm already looking into flights from California to Turin. Do you have a guest room? My wife and I are very tidy. ;-)

 

PS: you could put a Celestron NexYZ on the eyepiece and snap a shot to share with all of us!

I'm sorry, I don't have a guest room... If you come to Aosta Valley however we can definitely do some stargazing! 

 

Well, in theory I could connect my DSLR to the Supermaser, but without tracking the exposure is limited to something like 1/3 of a second



#23 TechYogi

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 06:58 PM

Congratulations on your new telescope Davide! Your review was excellent and the English of a high standard. I purchased a Takahashi 120 last year and have been enjoying it. I wanted to enjoy the night sky with a portable telescope and anything bigger would be problematic. Or so I thought. Perhaps this setup would work for me too. I wish you clear skies and happy viewing with this wonderful instrument!



#24 davidefg

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 04:17 PM

Congratulations on your new telescope Davide! Your review was excellent and the English of a high standard. I purchased a Takahashi 120 last year and have been enjoying it. I wanted to enjoy the night sky with a portable telescope and anything bigger would be problematic. Or so I thought. Perhaps this setup would work for me too. I wish you clear skies and happy viewing with this wonderful instrument!

Thank you very much! Takahashi refractors are really wonderful instruments! I used mine a lot for visual observations and it was truly amazing, especially for planetary work. I still remember some great views of Jupiter at 400x, with tons of details. The Supermaser is certainly not as portable as a refractor, but it fits without any problem in normal to big cars. The fork arms are the biggest part, but it's possible to purchase the foldable version in order to save some space. Thank you again and clear skies!



#25 BCEagleScope

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Posted 04 January 2024 - 04:58 PM

Wonderful in depth review of a beautiful big dob! I have a 16" Teeter and I really love the dob platform for the amazing visual results possible. I really enjoyed the coverage you provided of the scope. I'd love to hear an update now that you've had it a while. The only down side to my 16" Teeter is that it doesn't get as much use as I'd like. I really only pull it out in pretty optimal conditions, and opt for my smaller scopes when conditions are less than perfect.




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