Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

History of the Telescope: lecture, podcast @ U of A

Art Astrophotography ATM Beginner Classic DIY Equipment Imaging Lens Making Optics
  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Oregon-raybender

Oregon-raybender

    Optical Research Engineer

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,853
  • Joined: 13 May 2010
  • Loc: Oregon, South Western Coast

Posted 01 December 2023 - 06:54 PM

Here is a interesting lecture I found on archive.org on the

 

History of Telescopes and Binoculars

 

It's a University of Arizona lecture.

 

Bio: John Greivenkamp is a professor of optical sciences at the University of Arizona,

where he has taught courses in optical engineering since 1991. He is a fellow of SPIE

and of the Optical Society (OSA).  John passed away last year. A good friend of many

us in the optics field. He invited me to lecture there a few years ago to over 120 students

I donated a few one of kind optics for the museum, free forms lens, like the Alvarez lens. 

 

Enjoy.

 

Starry Nightswaytogo.gif

 

 

https://archive.org/...s_1000099227680

 

https://wp.optics.ar...u/jgreivenkamp/


  • Diego, Lalith, don clement and 2 others like this

#2 geovermont

geovermont

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 795
  • Joined: 06 May 2016
  • Loc: Vermont

Posted 02 December 2023 - 09:31 AM

I just listened to the presentation. Very interesting details on the development of terrestrial refractors and binocluars. I think that there's a distinction to be made between the use of brass for scientific instruments in general and the development of precision thin-wall brass tubing of precise dimensions for making terrestrial refractors. I think that he's saying that brass tubing of sufficient precision for making telescoping draw tubes came into use in the 1750s, but I'll note that there are beautiful brass reflecting telescopes made by James Short dating from the 1730s. Whether or not they had any precision thin-wall telescoping draw tubes, I don't know--perhaps heavier and clunkier pieces. At any rate, it's clear that the metallurgy of brass took some time to develop before it was a practical material for instruments, but it was clearly coming into use by the early 1700s.

 

Also, he's surprisingly dismissive of Galileo's contribution to telescope technology. I'm used to hearing that Galileo significantly improved the quality of the lenses as he worked to improve the telescope for astronomical uses. Anyway, it was a fascinating talk.

 

I'd like to hear a similar presentation on early reflecting telescopes.


  • Oregon-raybender likes this

#3 cuzimthedad

cuzimthedad

    Just Be Cuz

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 11,612
  • Joined: 09 Apr 2006
  • Loc: Nampa, ID

Posted 02 December 2023 - 01:33 PM

Moving to Astro Art, Books, Websites, and Other Media Forum...


  • Oregon-raybender likes this

#4 Lalith

Lalith

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 176
  • Joined: 09 Jun 2006
  • Loc: western suburbs, Chicago

Posted 02 December 2023 - 02:56 PM

Here is a interesting lecture I found on archive.org on the

 

History of Telescopes and Binoculars

 

It's a University of Arizona lecture.

Thank you Oregon-raybender for sharing this. Very interesting and informative, as always.


  • Oregon-raybender likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Art, Astrophotography, ATM, Beginner, Classic, DIY, Equipment, Imaging, Lens Making, Optics



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics