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AmScope 40X-2000X LED Trinocular Biological Compound Microscope, White, T490B-LED

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#1 Farzad_K

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 12:15 PM

Hello Folks.

 

I am just starting my new hobby of Microscopy to keep exploring for other worlds during the 300 days of cloudy days in the area where I live.

 

After much research I have purchased a trinocular scope and a DSLR adapter for my Nikon cameras to use with the scope for imaging (still and video); it is the AmScope 40X-2000X LED Trinocular Biological Compound Microscope, White, T490B-LED.

 

On social media I am advised to spend more and purchase scopes such as Nikon Optiphot or Optiphot 2 or Olympus BH2. I have found refurbished Nikon binocular scopes that can be modified into trinocular for imaging but I am not sure if there are great differences between these higher end (but used and refurbished) scopes and the one I have coming to me in a couple of days.

 

Focusing with the trinocular is going to be a bit of a different experience, and I have ordered a prepared set of slides so that I can go to work right away and begin learning how to use the scope and the DSLR.

 

I am interested in your opinions/suggestions, and if you use the same Amscope, what is your experience?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Farzad

 

 


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#2 D_talley

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 02:19 PM

I have an AmScope which I picked up in trade for some equipment. It does not come with the camera attachment, but I will upgrade it later. I am impressed with the image quality looking through the eyepieces. I also got the sample slides. Looking forward to getting into this once I slow down working on other projects.  Good luck with yours. 


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#3 topcode

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 05:03 PM


 

On social media I am advised to spend more and purchase scopes such as Nikon Optiphot or Optiphot 2 or Olympus BH2. I have found refurbished Nikon binocular scopes that can be modified into trinocular for imaging but I am not sure if there are great differences between these higher end (but used and refurbished) scopes and the one I have coming to me in a couple of days.

 

Well, there are many reasons why the big four (nikon, olympus, zeiss, leica) are called the big four. Ill go through some of the main reasons.

 

1) Objectives: The big four make microscopes, and microscope objectives. Your amscope has non plan achromats, which are fine, but you can get alot more with big four objectives, you dont even need a big four scope to use those objectives (sometimes, it depends) you can get plan, apochromat, phase contrast, iris, correction collar, water immersion, no cover slip, long working distance, and even more types of objectives from the big four.

 

2) DIC(and other advanced illumination methods): almost none of the cheap amazon scopes are even slightly plausible to convert to DIC, you need a big four scope. And with phase contrast, its sometimes possible for the scopes you can get on amazon to be converted to it, you can generally expect better results with big four scopes.

3) Reliability and service: My nikon SMZ-U is going strong, as a roughly 30 year old scope, only being serviced for a minor issue with the zoom not having clickstop function, will the dropshipped amscope be doing as well even 10 years down the road? It probably wont, and thats fine for most purposes, but its why big four scopes are so expensive, they are made to last.
 


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#4 Farzad_K

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 11:48 PM

I have an AmScope which I picked up in trade for some equipment. It does not come with the camera attachment, but I will upgrade it later. I am impressed with the image quality looking through the eyepieces. I also got the sample slides. Looking forward to getting into this once I slow down working on other projects.  Good luck with yours. 

Thanks Dwight, it is good to know it is a reasonably good scope. I picked up a Nikon 2x teleconverter non-autofocus for about $40 and will test that one out too, and when I get my slides I am going to try and see about sharpness with various objectives - I guess the 40x.



#5 Farzad_K

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Posted 03 December 2023 - 11:52 PM

Well, there are many reasons why the big four (nikon, olympus, zeiss, leica) are called the big four. Ill go through some of the main reasons.

 

1) Objectives: The big four make microscopes, and microscope objectives. Your amscope has non plan achromats, which are fine, but you can get alot more with big four objectives, you dont even need a big four scope to use those objectives (sometimes, it depends) you can get plan, apochromat, phase contrast, iris, correction collar, water immersion, no cover slip, long working distance, and even more types of objectives from the big four.

 

2) DIC(and other advanced illumination methods): almost none of the cheap amazon scopes are even slightly plausible to convert to DIC, you need a big four scope. And with phase contrast, its sometimes possible for the scopes you can get on amazon to be converted to it, you can generally expect better results with big four scopes.

3) Reliability and service: My nikon SMZ-U is going strong, as a roughly 30 year old scope, only being serviced for a minor issue with the zoom not having clickstop function, will the dropshipped amscope be doing as well even 10 years down the road? It probably wont, and thats fine for most purposes, but its why big four scopes are so expensive, they are made to last.
 

Agreed, thanks.



#6 j.gardavsky

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 01:18 PM

Farzad,

 

first of all, congratulations on your microscope!

 

If the type of your microscope is for the "finite" corrected objectives, like the 160mm, then you will be fine with most of the Carl Zeiss Jena objectives, which are today much cheaper than the Nikon or Olympus, as CZJ has ceased to exist.

For the 170mm standard, the old Leitz objectives would be useable.

 

The next to check, when looking around for the old CZJ or Leitz accessories, is the threading - the metric or the RMS, as you need to screw in the objectives.

 

Last, but not least are the microscope eyepieces, which have been designed to pair with the microscope objectives designs. And again, the old Leitz or CZJ eyepieces will deliver together with the matched objectives fantastic views.

 

Best regards,

JG


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#7 Farzad_K

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 03:47 PM

Farzad,

 

first of all, congratulations on your microscope!

 

If the type of your microscope is for the "finite" corrected objectives, like the 160mm, then you will be fine with most of the Carl Zeiss Jena objectives, which are today much cheaper than the Nikon or Olympus, as CZJ has ceased to exist.

For the 170mm standard, the old Leitz objectives would be useable.

 

The next to check, when looking around for the old CZJ or Leitz accessories, is the threading - the metric or the RMS, as you need to screw in the objectives.

 

Last, but not least are the microscope eyepieces, which have been designed to pair with the microscope objectives designs. And again, the old Leitz or CZJ eyepieces will deliver together with the matched objectives fantastic views.

 

Best regards,

JG

I have located used Nikon Optiphot and Labophot and Olympus BH-2 microscopes and am considering them even though they come with achromatic (Plan) instead of apochromatic objectives which I had hoped they come with, and that is sort of discouraging because light is light, and if it has to go through the same optics, and if the device is well designed and manufactured, then there shouldn't be an issue with going with AmScope.



#8 Farzad_K

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 03:50 PM

My current dilemma is if it is worth getting a trinocular scope given that the best objective I can have in between the stage and the sensor is the 100x and that might not be good enough to capture a lot of detail.

 

Are there processes to figure out the outcome on a sensor similar to the ones used for astroimaging? In microscopy I am assuming we use microns for target dimensions, and microns per pixel, I am assuming, might be an indication of actual resolution?

 

Farzad



#9 j.gardavsky

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Posted 04 December 2023 - 04:25 PM

Farzad,

 

the resolution of the objective is given by its numerical aperture N/A, engraved on the objective body,

https://www.olympus-...my/numaperture/

 

The achromatic objectives are often enough for the visual microscopy.

Imaging requires according to my experience the APOs, and even for the low magnifications.

 

Admitted,

my experience in microscopy is mostly limited to the incident light microscopy of the paleontological samples, which another hobby of mine,

https://www.cloudyni...-my-microscope/

 

But in this forum, we have top experienced members in the field of the high magnifications microscopy, and biological applications.

 

Best regards,

JG


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#10 Farzad_K

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Posted 05 December 2023 - 04:39 PM

Farzad,

 

the resolution of the objective is given by its numerical aperture N/A, engraved on the objective body,

https://www.olympus-...my/numaperture/

 

The achromatic objectives are often enough for the visual microscopy.

Imaging requires according to my experience the APOs, and even for the low magnifications.

 

Admitted,

my experience in microscopy is mostly limited to the incident light microscopy of the paleontological samples, which another hobby of mine,

https://www.cloudyni...-my-microscope/

 

But in this forum, we have top experienced members in the field of the high magnifications microscopy, and biological applications.

 

Best regards,

JG

 

Yes, imaging would be best with the APO-grade lenses (objectives), and they are pricy too but worth it once we get a hang of it. I will be checking mine out soon, but the achromatic objectives' color fringing isn't too bad considering there are other challenges such as razor-thin depth of field.


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