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The New Consolidated Atlas of the Near Side of the Moon vol. 1.

Moon Charts
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#1 AstronomyFred

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 02:18 AM

Dear all,

 

This project started in May 2022 with this thread, at the time I was confronted with names of features that I could not find a good source of information for. I made a map of the first quarter moon based on the names from Luna Cognita [epic book!], working through the days 1-6 of the lunation.

 

But due to the image scale my map was not accurate enough and did not mention any of the named features that have lost their official naming status in the 70's.
So I set out to make a few maps with much more detail and more names (e.g. Triesnecker found here and Montes Caucasus found here)

 

So now I was hooked on my quest to make a proper map including all the features, also those 'unnamed' at the moment.

 

I shared my progress in September 2022 in this post but there was a lot of ground to cover....

 

Over time I worked on the systematics, added more features from other sources and also created an index with all names and their source, so they would become more transparent for others to follow a name to the source.

 

 

So now [... Drum roll ...] "The New Consolidated Atlas of the Near Side of the Moon, Volume 1. Northern Hemisphere" is completed and was published it this week (here (and also at other local sites of "the big online book shop")). There is a Kindle version and also a paperback version available.

 

In total the Northern Hemisphere book alone contains 3454 named features of which 859 are features that used to have an official name, but have lost these over time.

 

Please find a sample page below (shared in an earlier thread as well):

 

Map12preview.jpg

 

I hope this resource will prove usefull to lunar observers!

 

Clear Skies,

 

Fred


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#2 RMay

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 02:36 AM

Hi and congrats on this great effort; can you let us know number of pages, and size?

Thanks,

Ron

#3 AstronomyFred

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 02:54 AM

Dear Ron,

 

Thanks for your post an wishes.

 

The book has 133 pages and is 8,5" x 11" (for Europeans: roughly A4 size).

There are 38 maps + 38 legend pages + 8 detail maps + 8 legend pages and the index is 32 pages long.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Kind regards,

 

Fredrick


Edited by AstronomyFred, 20 December 2023 - 02:56 AM.

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#4 frank5817

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 11:36 AM

Fred,

 

Good to see this here. I ordered the work in print copy and cannot wait to see it.

 

Frank


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#5 harpo80

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 12:15 PM

Excellent work!  Ordered.  Volume 2 will follow someday?  I can only imagine the work involved in this project.

 

Thanks,

Jack


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#6 AstronomyFred

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Posted 20 December 2023 - 10:44 PM

Dear Frank and Jack,

 

Thank you for your support and kind words.

 

I have set myself the goal to finish part two by this time next year... 

The first part took a bit longer, but I also gained some experience in the workflow.

 

Kind regards,

 

Fred


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#7 jonbosley

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 12:49 AM

Hi Fred, does your atlas specify what is official nomenclature and what is not? I can see an issue where new and future  official nomenclature could replace the unofficial past designations. How does it compare to the LROC resources that are continuously updated? 
 

Jon



#8 kgb

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 12:59 AM

Great timing. I was just shopping for a new moon atlas. Just ordered a copy. Looking forward to getting it.

#9 AstronomyFred

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 01:24 AM

Hi Fred, does your atlas specify what is official nomenclature and what is not? I can see an issue where new and future  official nomenclature could replace the unofficial past designations. How does it compare to the LROC resources that are continuously updated? 
 

Jon

 

Hi Jon,

Indeed it does. 

On the maps the unofficial features are coloured in yellow. This is to make exactly the distinction you refer to for exactly that reason.

In addition, in the Index each feature also has the source mentioned, here one can see if the feature is official ("IAU"), or from another source. It also notes on which map/location the feature can be found in that source.

Please see the sample below:

 

Index sample.jpg

 

 

Great timing. I was just shopping for a new moon atlas. Just ordered a copy. Looking forward to getting it.

Thanks kgb!


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#10 zjc26138

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 08:53 AM

I ordered a copy as well, can't wait to get it!


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#11 eyeoftexas

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Posted 21 December 2023 - 10:12 AM

I thought I was done shopping this season, but then saw this.  Looking forward to it and vol. 2 in the near future. 


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#12 AstronomyFred

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Posted 22 December 2023 - 09:01 AM

Thanks zjc and eyeoftexas!


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#13 PEterW

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Posted 22 December 2023 - 01:50 PM

What base imagery are you using? Looks like we’ll get more detail than 21st century and the duplex atlases. The latter is quite “dark” and doesn’t show rilles and other subtle
Features too well… getting the greyscale/contrast set “just right” is tricky! Do you also consider the libration areas, how do you show them?
What sort of paper and binding are you using? The ring binding of the atlases I note above are quite handy, thought the 21st century I always worry I’m going to rip a page out of.

Peter

Edited by PEterW, 22 December 2023 - 01:52 PM.


#14 AstronomyFred

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Posted 22 December 2023 - 04:51 PM

Dear Peter,

 

Thanks for your questions.

 

The images are based on LROC images. I am not sure if the detail level is higher than the other atlasses you mentioned, I have not compared them.

You sure are right about the contrast; this is not easy to achieve; I did my best to get the visibility as well as possible, but especially the dorsa in the mare's can be difficult to see. I believe that these are a bit better to see in the digital version.

 

I did not make special maps on the liberation area's of the Moon and the book is printed on normal paper with a paperback binding. 

 

The aim of this atlas is to provide a source for the hundreds of names that have been discontinued in the 70's such as the greek lettered elevations, double lettered craters (although some do still exist) and Roman numerals for the rimae. These features are often referred to in other publications. There are other sources from that time period, but these are either incomplete, incovenient, inaccessible or inaccurate (not necessarily meaning erreoneously, but often difficult to assertain which feature is meant exactly). Example of different levels of accuracy: comparing the Nasa LAC maps from 1962 with the Nasa AIC maps; the AIC will show features that the Nasa LAC maps do not;

 

LAC vs AIC CN.jpg

 

To be fair and complete in my answer; John Moore's book 'Features of the Near Side Moon' does mention the roman numerals for the rimae. 

 

I think that when comparing this atlas to the other mentioned atlasses, or the Rükl Moon atlas [nifty feature: my atlas follows the Rükl maps to make it easier to compare], one will notice that this atlas will tell you more feature names, it will tell you which ones are official and which not and it will tell you what source it was taken from. I have used it at my telescope myself, but it is not a laminated ring bound book. It is made less for use outside; e.g. the Duplex Moon atlas is ring bound and also very useful with SCT's.

 

To make a comparison with Map 12 which I have shared above with Rükl's map (The only new/modern atlas I have at hand here): 

- Rükl's map will show rilles, dorsa, etc better as it is drawn rather than photographed

- Rükl's map 12 has a fewer features labelled (ca. 40 vs ca. 60)

- Rükl's map shows a few unofficial features (e.g. Mons Piton Gamma), but does not distinguish between unofficial and official names.

- Rükl's map shows the landing site of Luna 2, my atlas does not.

- Rükl's atlas provides some information on the main features, my atlas does not

- Rükl's atlas does not have an index on all sub features, only on main features; e.g. for Cassini, the index lists only Cassini on map 12, my index lists 16 features for Cassini and its sub features on map 12 and 13.

 

Some features not labelled in Rükl and present in this atlas for Map 12, focussing only on the north west part of the map:

- Plato KA 

- Alpes B

- Trouvelot G

- Piazza Smith Pi

- Piazza Smith Y

- Piazza Smith W

- Piazza Smith Z

- Piazza Smith Alpha

- Piazza Smith V

- Piazza Smith Beta

- Cassini N

 

Moving down from there my atlas labels the individual features of Montes Spitzbergen, other modern atlasses do not (to my knowledge).

 

So to summarise: This atlas will likely have more labelled / named features than other atlasses, it distinguishes between official and unofficial names and links the features to official maps and older sources. It is not made for being out in damp weather and only shows the upright maps.

 

I think that would be my most honest comparison.

 

I can only encourage and invite everyone to look at the region shown above in map 12 and compare your/the other atlas with my preview.

 

Kind regards,

 

Fredrick


Edited by AstronomyFred, 23 December 2023 - 01:03 AM.

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#15 PEterW

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Posted 22 December 2023 - 05:49 PM

Thank you for such a detailed reply and for the work you’ve put in to this. The number of times I’ve seen unmarked on moon maps… now we will know what they’re called. Do you have the latest feature Sinus Viscositatis https://www.cloudyni...e-of-jan-2023/? Not sure how often the IAU add new names.
Rukl shows some features better than LROC, but then it shows a blotchy mess in the highlands, where photos clearly show all the different craters… no one map seems to do it all.

Peter
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#16 AstronomyFred

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Posted 23 December 2023 - 12:46 AM

Dear Peter,

 

Happy you liked the answer. waytogo.gif

 

Indeed the IAU adds new names from time to time.

I do not know if there is a fixed pattern, I think they review proposals as they arise, but this is actually an interesting question.

 

The Sinus Viscositatis is included in this Atlas:

 

Sinus Viscositatis CN.jpg

 

It is just in between Gruithuisen K (number 41 in the screenshot) and Gruithuisen Zeta (number 57 in this screenshot -> yellow = unofficial name)

For those interested: number 60 is Delisle Gamma (the other unofficial feature in this screenshot).

 

Kind regards,

 

Fredrick


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#17 altair1956

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Posted 26 December 2023 - 10:59 AM

This looks like a great atlas. Thanks for putting in the work. 

We have been using the guide from the Astronomical League in my astronomy society to encourage members to do more lunar observing and I think this is a great addition to our efforts. 

I have ordered one for myself from that great all encompassing vendor in the sky. 


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#18 AstronomyFred

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Posted 26 December 2023 - 04:20 PM

Thanks Altair,

 

I hope that you like it!

 

You can use the Rükl references of the AL target list, it would corresponds with the maps in this atlas. 

I always enjoy observing the moon with others, it's so much fun talking about what everyone's seeing.

 

Fred



#19 rikhill

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Posted 29 December 2023 - 10:27 PM

Wish I had seen this book BEFORE Christmas! Now I'll have to come up with a good reason (for my astronomer wife) for me to get it now.

-Rik


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#20 AstronomyFred

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Posted 30 December 2023 - 04:39 AM

Thanks Rik!

 

A bit jealous that you have to reason with an astronomer wife.

My wife would say:  "How many books on the moon do you need, honey?"

To which I would answer: "About one for each day of the year, sweetheart." laugh.gif

 

Kind regards,

 

Fredrick


Edited by AstronomyFred, 30 December 2023 - 11:53 PM.

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#21 harpo80

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Posted 07 January 2024 - 07:19 AM

The book arrived a couple of days ago.  Print quality is very good and the photo atlas will keep me busy for years on moon features.  Nice job!  Keep us posted on volume two please!


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#22 DVexile

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Posted 07 January 2024 - 08:45 AM

I'm really impressed by the Kindle sample I just looked at (the sample has the introduction, overview map, and first two maps).  I've never seen a visual Kindle title this impressively presented.  The file is about 240MB to give an idea the resolution contained.

 

It views more like a PDF than typical Kindle titles, by which I mean it has actual "pages" that one can pinch to zoom rather than free flowing text with inline images.  This is critical for a book like this where the large maps/images are the major feature of the book and all the textual information is actually tables.  The resolution of the map/image pages is excellent.

 

Typically for an atlas I'd think a physical copy is the only thing that makes practical sense.  In this case I might actually prefer the electronic Kindle version.  The beautiful maps as presented seem like they must benefit from the increased contrast of a display in comparison to a printed page - especially as glare on dark fields is usually an issue in physical prints without very controlled lighting.  The physical copy doesn't sound as if it is intended for at the telescope use so much, but an iPad by the scope is easy and for lunar viewing dark adaptation is not a concern.

 

The one obvious drawback to iPad viewing is that one can't benefit from having a map and its table viewed side by side simultaneously like in the physical book.  One has to swipe between them.

 

Fredrick, you have any opinions on the various benefits and trade-offs between the physical and electronic copies?  I'm guessing you approve of both since both are on offer!

 

And thanks for all the effort that went into this amazing resource!


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#23 AstronomyFred

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Posted 07 January 2024 - 12:32 PM

Hi Jack,

Thanks, I am happy you like it!

Volume 2 is in the making, I plan to have it done by the end of the year.

 

Hi DVexile,

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

I think your points are very well thought through.

When I made the Kindle version I had two thoughts:

1) I wanted to offer a lower cost alternative, avoiding printing costs.

2) I wanted to offer an alternative where the maps can be zoomed in.

 

As you noted, the Kindle version is made in such a way that it does not 'reflow', it behaves as a book with pages that can be resized.

 

So what are the pros and cons of either version from my current perspective:

 

Printed version:

- Easier viewing map and legend side by side

- Easier to refer to the Index and back to a map

- Easier to look at edge areas, switching between maps

- Depending on the size of screen, the total map in unzoomed status may be a bit larger than a tablet

- Does not need batteries :)

- Personally I find it a bit quicker to find something via the index..

- Easier to have at hand when viewing different sources; I like to have physical books when I work on my observation notes or images, as I will likely have several sources open.

 

Kindle version:

- Can be zoomed in to look at details area's of the map.

- Dorsa and rilles are likely a bit easier to see

- There are a number of "small" craters, that are definitely better to see in the Kindle version.

- Easier to have at the eyepiece

- Switching back and forth to the legend and the index is a bit more difficult.

- Needs an electronic device to read, and batteries...

- In a Kindle one can make notes (although I have not figured out how to yet..)

 

Of all of these I think the zoom feature is the largest difference between both versions and the personal preference of a person wanting to hold a book or not...

 

I hope that my comments help a bit.

 

Clear Skies!

 

Fred


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#24 EsaT

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Posted 18 February 2024 - 05:57 PM


Kindle version:

...

- Easier to have at the eyepiece

So how does that Kindle do in -20C?

While power draw might be small enough for freezing Li-ion battery to handle, kinda suspect that display might become little bit too static when already LCDs start to retain image...



#25 AstronomyFred

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Posted 19 February 2024 - 03:30 PM

Fair point Esa, I think the paper version wins that one ;)




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