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Outside the total view area what will I see?

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#1 adl6009

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Posted 26 January 2024 - 04:55 PM

I am on Long Island, NY and was curious about what kind of view I would have with a Celestron NexStar Evolution 6" Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope and  a solar filter?  Would I see the moon passing the sun in close proximity?  Any recommendations for the solar filter? Thanks.



#2 Bigred77

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Posted 26 January 2024 - 05:11 PM

I believe you will still get a partial eclipse

Use this eclipse map and point the center right to where you are

https://www.celestia...wer/viewer.html

Map was created by someone on here, it will give you a good idea of how much and how long of an eclipse you will get

#3 kfiscus

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Posted 26 January 2024 - 05:15 PM

I didn't know where you live on Long Island.  This result is off of timeanddate.com for New York City.

 

EDIT:  I don't know why the image got so small when I attached it.  It shows a very slender crescent sun with maximum eclipse happening around 3:25 PM.

 

You definitely want to get a solar filter (plastic film or glass) ASAP.  They may already be out of stock.

 

Good luck.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20240126_161157.jpg

Edited by kfiscus, 26 January 2024 - 06:05 PM.


#4 timelapser

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Posted 26 January 2024 - 05:44 PM

Would I see the moon passing the sun in close proximity?

You definitely won't see the moon itself during a partial eclipse - the dark side facing us is completely swamped by the light of the sun.  But you'll see that a part of the sun is being obscured by the moon.



#5 SporadicGazer

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Posted 26 January 2024 - 07:07 PM

I am on Long Island, NY and was curious about what kind of view I would have with a Celestron NexStar Evolution 6" Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope and  a solar filter?  Would I see the moon passing the sun in close proximity?  Any recommendations for the solar filter? Thanks.

Xavier Jubier's map says you'd have an 89% partial:

 
http://xjubier.free....=7&TZ=-4.0&LC=1

 

(or so, I put the marker in the middle of Long Island.)

 

 

You're close enough that making the effort to get to the 100% total region really seems worth it!

 

I say that in hindsight.  We didn't make the effort in 2017 and I've been kicking myself since.

 

The partial was "OK, that's cool. Now back to what I was doing." level excitement.  The Annular, thru light clouds, was "WOW! That's cool!!! I'm glad I came despite that !#$! drive."  Total is supposed to be orders of magnitude better than an Annular.  So we're flying to south Texas with fingers crossed for this one.


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#6 adl6009

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Posted 27 January 2024 - 12:47 AM

Thanks again.  Time and date says I will have 89% obscured.  That sounds interesting.  I'll look for a solar filter tonight.  



#7 havasman

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Posted 27 January 2024 - 01:31 AM

You should look instead for a way to get into the zone of totality. 


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#8 Napp

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Posted 27 January 2024 - 02:36 AM

Thanks again.  Time and date says I will have 89% obscured.  That sounds interesting.  I'll look for a solar filter tonight.  

If you are that close go to totality.  There is really no comparison between partial and totality.  I’ve seen totality and partial.  You do not want to miss totality if at all possible.  
 

Think of it this way.  A partial eclipse is like standing outside the ballpark for game 7 of the World Series with no radio, tv or internet.  You can hear some crowd noise but that’s it.  Totality is like box seats behind home plate.


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#9 cee_dee.exe

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Posted 27 January 2024 - 10:35 AM

A partial eclipse is like standing outside the ballpark for game 7 of the World Series with no radio, tv or internet.  You can hear some crowd noise but that’s it.  Totality is like box seats behind home plate.

I've sat behind home plate for a playoff-intensity game before, first row, and I can definitely agree with this analogy, it's a once-in-a-lifetime experience, even though I've never been in the path of totality for a solar eclipse, just partial.

 

Given that I've seen a few partials throughout my life - which really does come down to a feeling of "wow, that was cool, I'm gonna go back inside" and that's about it - I'm making the 5 hour drive to get to totality. I think, if you can make the trip north from Long Island to VT, NH, Maine, or northwest to parts of New York near Watertown, Buffalo, Syracuse, etc, that's really going to give you that once-in-a-lifetime show.

 

If you do decide to drive and plan to stay somewhere, book a place now - hotels and rentals are filling up and getting expensive.


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#10 T~Stew

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Posted 04 February 2024 - 12:01 AM

Just remember, being very close to totality is still only 0% totality. You will not get to see the sun go totally black or look with your naked eyes at all.

 

If its just too much fuss I get it, but this will be the last opportunity for a long time Probably the only total in the NE USA any of us will have the chance to see in our lifetimes. If you can travel across country, there will be totals in 2044/2045. If the forecast the night before is saying clear skies, I'd be driving north/west early in the morning, maybe plan a hike at a park or visit something you'd like to see. I'd be hiking a peak in the Adirondacks, though trails are muddy and likely parking spots will be taken. If its calling for clouds, then stay home and maybe check to see if you can see the partial though the clouds. Just an idea, good luck!


Edited by T~Stew, 04 February 2024 - 12:15 AM.

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