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Total Solar Eclipse April 8, 2024

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#1 Olympian

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 02:57 PM

On April 8, 2024 there will be a total solar eclipse visible across North America. For me it’s really great  because the path of totality crosses New York State. Specifically upstate. Living in Brooklyn, New York I am approximately 250 miles from the actual path of totality which runs across Syracuse. They say New York City will have close to 90% of the sun that will be blocked. Syracuse is approximately a four hour drive. I have two choices here. Stay in the New York City area and see near 90% blocked out or take the four drive and see a very rare occurrence of a total eclipse.

 

Does anyone on this group ever experience 90% of the sun blocked and if so how dark will it get. The main thing it has to be a near sunny day especially at the start of the eclipse.


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#2 Max-OP

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:05 PM

Make the drive to get inside the path of totality. There is no comparison between a 90% partial eclipse and a total eclipse. Most people would not even notice the slightly diminished light of a 90% partial event. A total eclipse reveals the sun’s corona, which is spectacular. There will be a darkening of the sky. People will yell, scream, cry and let of whoops of joy. It is truly a life changing event. Just hope for clear skies!


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#3 oneuke

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:19 PM

If you go to the path of totality, you will see  the difference between 90% and 100%.  I went to see the annular eclipse in NM last year.  While it was dimmer and colder at maximum annularity, it still was daytime.  During totality you can see bright stars and planets.  Here's hoping for clear skies.


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#4 MEE

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:23 PM

It won’t get dark at 90%. The light will be silvery and strange, and the glare will be reduced.

If you have a chance, go to the path of totality, between the red lines:

http://xjubier.free....gleMapFull.html

There is NO comparison

Need inspiration?

See https://eclipse482024.blogspot.com/ - my blog

Posts to highlight:

“Totality, it’s getting dark”- notice the rapid drop in light level between 99% and totality

“An incredible experience is coming” - my detailed description of what a total eclipse is like.

If you stop at
“The light has a silvery tint. It feels cooler.” - that’s what you’ll experience at 90%.

Read on to see what you’ll experience in the totality path

Also, see the posts titled “An Inspiring….” Those are stories and videos from people who have experienced previous total eclipses
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#5 donniesoprano

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:23 PM

Take the drive.  My wife and I drove into the path of totality in 2017 for our first total eclipse experience (3 hrs there and 3 back).  We're flying to Dallas and driving to the center of the path in April.  IMO, these really are once in a lifetime events for most, so if you have the opportunity and means, you shouldn't pass it up.

 

For me, there was a lot more to it than just 'it gets dark'.  There was something ethereal about the experience for me, when I consider the rarity, the energy that the sun puts out, the size and scale of the objects involved, the physics behind all of it...it was just sort of magical.  I will go to every total eclipse that I can arrange for the rest of my life.

 

From the partial eclipse in June of this year we had 52% coverage at home.  There was noticeable dimming starting around 45%, but it was still daylight all the way through.  Sort of hard to describe, but a total eclipse is significantly different than a partial.

 

ds


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#6 aeajr

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:48 PM

On April 8, 2024 there will be a total solar eclipse visible across North America. For me it’s really great  because the path of totality crosses New York State. Specifically upstate. Living in Brooklyn, New York I am approximately 250 miles from the actual path of totality which runs across Syracuse. They say New York City will have close to 90% of the sun that will be blocked. Syracuse is approximately a four hour drive. I have two choices here. Stay in the New York City area and see near 90% blocked out or take the four drive and see a very rare occurrence of a total eclipse.

 

Does anyone on this group ever experience 90% of the sun blocked and if so how dark will it get. The main thing it has to be a near sunny day especially at the start of the eclipse.

I live on Long Island.  I will be heading to Western PA and have a hotel room reserved in the area.  I will be near Erie PA for the eclipse.   The path runs right along the coast of Lake Erie.  Depending on weather I can run North or South along the path to try and reach clear sky.

 

Syracuse is just barley in the total eclipse area.  Looks like about a 5 hour trip there.  I would plan to run toward Rochester or push up to Oswego if upstate is your plan. 

 

Here are maps of the path and the span of totality.  (Maps are a way down the page) The closer to the center line the longer the duration.

https://nationaleclipse.com/maps.html

 

Erie PA, Oswego, and Rochester NY will get around 3 and a half minutes of totality.  Syracuse will get about 1 and a half minutes. 

 

As for NYC/Long Island, 90% will provide a dimming effect but you will still need your solar glasses.   

 

This website will show you approximately how much of the sun will be covered when viewed from Brooklyn.  The experience will be nothing like totality.

https://www.timeandd...yn?iso=20240408

 

The next total solar eclipse to touch our area won't be for 50 years.  Plan to make the run.  Find a place to stay Sunday Night so you are in good position on Monday.   You would not want to miss it due to traffic or some other non-weather issue. 


Edited by aeajr, 29 January 2024 - 04:09 PM.

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#7 lee14

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 03:55 PM

Take the drive, but be aware there's only a one in three chance of clear skies at that time of year in Central New York.

 

Lee


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#8 Sincos

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 04:13 PM

All or nuttin’ , do the drive . Why would you stand outside of a venue for your favourite group and not go inside if it’s free ? 


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#9 deepwoods1

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 04:24 PM

If you want to SEE the eclipse, you need to be within it's path. Drive a little further....

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#10 geovermont

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 04:31 PM

Yes, as they say above, there's no comparison. Go to totality!


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#11 BOSS3128

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 05:03 PM

Just to re-iterate what everyone else has been saying:  Partial and Totality are two totally different events.

 

If you can, be in a crowd.  I was for 2017 (first eclipse), and everyone's reaction was a real memory.  I will bring a videocamera to catch the crowd for this year.

 

Plan on being in traffic.  The roughly 2 hr trip to totality took me almost 5 hrs. to get back home, and that was with well planned routes.

 

It is worth all the effort.


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#12 JOEinCO

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 05:09 PM

Be sure to check out the ongoing Eclipse thread here on Cloudy Nights.  waytogo.gif 

 

https://www.cloudyni...-8-2024-thread/


Edited by JOEinCO, 30 January 2024 - 12:45 PM.

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#13 SporadicGazer

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 05:31 PM

Heck, there's an entired sub-forum dedicated to the April Eclipse:

 

https://www.cloudyni...r-eclipse-2024/


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#14 MEE

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 07:35 PM

To the OP: what is your time frame?

CAN you spend the night in or near the totality path on 4/7 to 4/8?

CAN you spend the night in or near the totality path on 4/8 to 4/9?

Or would you have to do it all in one day?
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#15 BOSS3128

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 08:20 PM

To the OP: what is your time frame?

CAN you spend the night in or near the totality path on 4/7 to 4/8?

CAN you spend the night in or near the totality path on 4/8 to 4/9?

Or would you have to do it all in one day?

I would say given the 8 hrs. normal round trip travel time, trying to do all that driving in one day with traffic being a mess afterward will be very difficult.  Not wanting to dissuade the OP, but agreeing with MEE, plan on a motel stay over.

 

On 4/7 I am driving 7 hrs. to my intermediate stop (motel) in Dyersburg TN, then plan on the 1.5 hr drive to Kelso MO the morning of 4/8, then probably a 4 hr drive back to the motel after the eclipse, then home the next morning.


Edited by BOSS3128, 29 January 2024 - 08:21 PM.

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#16 michaeledward64

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 09:28 PM

If you plan to drive ... leave early. Like a day or two early.

Plan on staying late. At least an extra night.

If you don't, expect to be stuck in traffic ... and miss the show completely.

That way, you won't be disappointed.


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#17 brentwood

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 10:08 PM

It won’t get dark at 90%. The light will be silvery and strange, and the glare will be reduced.

If you have a chance, go to the path of totality, between the red lines:

http://xjubier.free....gleMapFull.html

There is NO comparison

Need inspiration?

See https://eclipse482024.blogspot.com/ - my blog

Posts to highlight:

“Totality, it’s getting dark”- notice the rapid drop in light level between 99% and totality

“An incredible experience is coming” - my detailed description of what a total eclipse is like.

If you stop at
“The light has a silvery tint. It feels cooler.” - that’s what you’ll experience at 90%.

Read on to see what you’ll experience in the totality path

Also, see the posts titled “An Inspiring….” Those are stories and videos from people who have experienced previous total eclipses

That's a great link, best I've seen! I knew we were close but our family near Ottawa is only a  13 min drive from  totality. That will only be eight seconds, so we'd better go a bit farther. Until we run out of country that is! Don't want to be crossing any borders that day!


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#18 grom

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Posted 30 January 2024 - 06:52 AM

On April 8, 2024 there will be a total solar eclipse visible across North America. For me it’s really great  because the path of totality crosses New York State. Specifically upstate. Living in Brooklyn, New York I am approximately 250 miles from the actual path of totality which runs across Syracuse. They say New York City will have close to 90% of the sun that will be blocked. Syracuse is approximately a four hour drive. I have two choices here. Stay in the New York City area and see near 90% blocked out or take the four drive and see a very rare occurrence of a total eclipse.

 

Does anyone on this group ever experience 90% of the sun blocked and if so how dark will it get. The main thing it has to be a near sunny day especially at the start of the eclipse.

Partial eclipse and total eclipse are two very different things. And it really has little to do with "how dark it gets".

 

Go total.


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#19 Nerd1

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Posted 30 January 2024 - 07:27 PM

For anyone coming to the Dallas area. Lake Tawakoni east of Dallas is right on the line, Totality goes right through my neighborhood.  On the North Side of the lake there is a city park in the town of West Tawakoni. On the south side of the Lake near my house is Lake Tawakoni State Park, you can purchase a day pass pretty cheap. There are numerous public boat ramps with parking lots that are free,  with big parking lots. 


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#20 CollinofAlabama

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Posted 31 January 2024 - 01:15 PM

I live in West Texas, which is not in the path of totality at all this time.  To answer the OP, yes, a 90% blockage of the sun by the moon is definitely worth seeing and interesting, but a total eclipse is a whole 'nother level.  Drove 15 hours one-way to Hendersonville, Tennessee, just northeast of Nashville, in 2017, to see the last one.  I'd been clouded out of two eclipses by then (a total in Mexico at the Teotihuacan pyramid of the moon in 1991, and an annular here at my home in West Texas in 2012) so was quite worried about going deep into the Mississippi Valley to see it, but we met friends who drove down from Indiana we hadn't seen in ages.  It was amazing.  Birds will return to their nests in the trees.  We saw it at a somewhat wooded park (with grassy stretches) by locks on the Cumberland River.  Although clouds threatened, they did not interfere until after totality.  My sister and her family drove up, last minute, from Decatur, Alabama to meet us after saying they weren't interested.  Everyone was interested.  It was SO COOL, even non-astronomers loved it (my two daughters, even).

 

I was planning to drive to Andrews, Texas, about an hour and 45 minutes to see the last annular eclipse, but after investigating it, found the amount of the moon that would cover the sun from that distance was only 1% greater than my front yard, so just decided to stay here.  On the day of the annular eclipse (a partial eclipse here with 88% coverage, vs. 89% in the annular path), I packed up my telescope and prepared to go to a crowded venue where our Club members were to show the public the event, but my previously uninterested daughters, via their eclipse sunglasses, were suddenly quite interested.  So I set up my 4" ED refractor with solar filter in our front driveway.  Neighbors came over and it was a great party, lots of fun!  It was a special event, and the shadows in the leaves were amazing, but ... it wasn't like a total eclipse.  It was definitely worth seeing, and people in NYC and environs who cannot get into the path of totality, for whatever reason, it's worth your time.  BUT, if you have the ability to make the effort, and you are fortunate enough to see it, you'll know it was worth it.  And everything cool and interesting about a partial eclipse happens before and after a total one, except you get the cosmic unity experience of the total eclipse.  There is something mystical about it all.

 

I had a friend from our Club who went to Saint Louis to see family in 2017 and was rained out, missed the whole thing.  We went to Tennessee to see friends, and the eclipse was a sure-hope-we-can aspect to it, since I'd been clouded out in previous attempts.  And that was part of why I didn't do down to Andrews or drive over to New Mexico to see the annular, no one in my family wanted to go.  But if you can build other things into the trip, like seeing the Teotihuacan pyramids, or friends you hadn't seen in a long while, or a visit to some University or Lake Erie or some Park you want to visit, too, so if the sky gods frown on you and deliver cloudy skies, you'll be better off emotionally.

 

The traffic back to West Texas from Nashville was rough.  5 mph driving bumper-to-bumper in dark fields at night in Arkansas in the middle of nowhere, just interstate traffic moving like rush hour in DFW or something.  We had planned to spend the night, anyway, and we did, in Texarkana, but it took us a LOT longer to get there from Nashville than expected.  Be prepared for the mass exodus back to NYC on the afternoon/evening of the 8th.  If you can spend the night somewhere along the way or near your observing site, that's not a bad idea at all.  Good luck


Edited by CollinofAlabama, 31 January 2024 - 03:35 PM.

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#21 EricSi

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Posted 07 February 2024 - 10:32 PM

trying to do all that driving in one day with traffic being a mess afterward will be very difficult.  Not wanting to dissuade the OP, but agreeing with MEE, plan on a motel stay over.

I suspect that traffic will be a nightmare afterwards. After the eclipse in August 2017 we made the mistake of driving home right away, and it took us almost 12 hours to get back to Seattle from Corvallis (which is normally about a 4 hour drive). Much better to stay overnight than fight the traffic.....


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#22 mich_al

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Posted 07 February 2024 - 10:57 PM

Last eclipse I flew across the country to be in the desert with the best chance of not being clouded over.  Once in a lifetime experience, don't miss it. Make the drive !  Arrive early because along the path of totality there will be large crowds.  Don't try to make any reservations now near totality, its way too late already,



#23 paul hart

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Posted 07 February 2024 - 11:18 PM

As a bunch of folks wrote, get in the path of totality. There is no comparison between 99 and 100 percent I hope you get great weather. I live out on Long Island. I decided to go to near Austin, Texas as it is directly in the path and the clouds are not as bad as in NY, I think we have a 50% chance of seeing it I'm going with my daughter and since we are both music junkies, at least we get to spend a couple of days in Austin. I saw my first total eclipse in 2017. We visited friends in Wyoming/ We had great skies and it truly is something that I will always remember.


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#24 jfaldo

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Posted 09 February 2024 - 11:32 AM

In 2017 we were lucky we only drove about 50 miles for totality. This time we're making a 3200 mile round trip drive to Ohio to be in totality. Yes it's absolutely worth it to do so without a doubt. Of course we kill two birds with one stone going to Ohio where most of our families live.


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#25 Wolfwatcher

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Posted 10 February 2024 - 10:15 PM

First pic. Almost noon, Casper WY. Second pic, after 3rd contact, less than 1 min. later than first pic.

 

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