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RGBH for totality

3 replies to this topic

#1 Bob Kimball

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Posted 21 February 2024 - 11:18 PM

I'm heading down to see the ecipse.  I plan on taking my telescope (W.O. FLT 110) and image with my ASI2600 ZWO camera.  I plan on shooting the totality in RGBH.  I'm I crazy.  



#2 banjo1000

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 02:32 AM

You will have be making yourself a potential problem registering the pictures because the most prominent feature, the limb of the moon keeps moving. Switch filters every shot. If you have access to a color camera, you will be much happier. Joe
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#3 ch-viladrich

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 09:03 AM

You will have be making yourself a potential problem registering the pictures because the most prominent feature, the limb of the moon keeps moving. Switch filters every shot. If you have access to a color camera, you will be much happier. Joe

Indeed !

 

On top of that, if "H" means Halpha, then it is perfectly useless during totality.

 

I've used a BW sensor and a r' filter in the past because I was aiming at high resolution imaging. The r' filter was used to remove atmospheric dispersion and chromatism in the optical system.

 

But for "classic" TSE imaging, it is way easier to just use a color sensor. And we will still have a big challenge to register and stack properly the images ;-)


Edited by ch-viladrich, 22 February 2024 - 09:05 AM.


#4 SteveInNZ

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Posted 22 February 2024 - 02:56 PM

On top of that, if "H" means Halpha, then it is perfectly useless during totality.


A deep sky H-alpha filter during totality (near C2 and C3) would increase the contrast between the chromosphere/proms and the inner corona compared to just a red filter which would only reduce the corona contribution by a third. If you really wanted to get into the proms, the H-alpha might gain you some finer detail.

 

I think that if I was imaging with a mono camera, I'd just go with Luminance and maybe the H-a, for the reasons above. The eclipse/corona is essentially monochrome unless you are doing a wide shot. But I also think that I'd want different focal lengths for each of those, so the H-a would be in the "why not give it a go" camp.

 

Steve.





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