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Noob Eclipse Lens/Aperture Question

Eclipse DSLR
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#1 mdredmond

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 08:04 AM

I'm planning to shoot the eclipse with a Nikon D750 and a (rented) Nikkor 300mm f/2.8-22 lens and 2x Nikkor teleconverter. Apparently I'll lose two stops of aperture using the teleconverter.   

 

I have the exposure settings chart from mreclipse.com.  In it he suggests shutter speeds for various ISO and aperture combinations.

 

My question is:  Does the camera know about the teleconverter?  Or do I need to set aperture two stops lower than what I actually want?   For example if I'm going to use shutter speeds for f/8 should I set aperture on the camera to f/8 or instead to f/4 to account for the teleconverter?

 

I feel pretty stupid asking this but despite getting decent pics of the last eclipse, I'm *not* a photographer.

 

Thanks!



#2 kathyastro

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 08:23 AM

Are you planning to set the camera to manual settings or using automatic?  I don't recommend automatic for this shoot, but if you do use it, the camera will figure out what it needs.

 

If you are using manual settings (recommended), which is what it sounds like you are planning, then the camera knows nothing.  If you need f/8, then you should set the aperture to f/4.

 

The teleconverter might relay lens settings to the camera or it might not, depending on the model.  If it does, though, that would affect automatic operation only.


Edited by kathyastro, 27 February 2024 - 08:25 AM.

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#3 lee14

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 08:49 AM

It's a perfectly reasonable question, but there's no reason to rely on theoretical possibilities. Kathy is of course correct regarding manual settings, etc. The solution is simple though, you can try out your system well in advance of the eclipse and determine the optimal settings yourself. Gone are the days when we would have to wait hours or days for film results, you can see in real time which ISO, exposure length, focal length, etc, are appropriate. Any pre-eclipse clear day will do. Except for the total phase, the settings you use now to obtain acceptable results from the uneclipsed disc will be the same, or very close to, those required for the partial phases, Obtaining the best exposures during totality itself is simply the work of seconds, and as stated above, is best done in manual mode. 

 

The sequence here employed a 250mm lens on a Canon T3i, and with the exception of totality, the optimal settings for the partial phases were determined beforehand. This was 2017, and although totality would have benefited from a longer exposure, it lasted only a brief period at my location, and I didn't want to spend the entire event fiddling with the camera.

 

Lee

 

8 X 10 version angled comp and cropped.jpg


Edited by lee14, 27 February 2024 - 08:53 AM.

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#4 mdredmond

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 09:00 AM

Okay, thanks, folks.   Yeah I plan on several practice sessions since I've got new gear to figure out (tracker, etc.).  I'll definitely be manual the entire time, letting the laptop take of pictures.  

 

Thanks again!


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#5 lee14

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Posted 27 February 2024 - 09:21 AM

Okay, thanks, folks.   Yeah I plan on several practice sessions since I've got new gear to figure out (tracker, etc.).  I'll definitely be manual the entire time, letting the laptop take of pictures.  

 

Thanks again!

Oh, as an addendum, the image sequence above was obtained using a fixed tripod, so if your exposures are short enough, tracking shouldn't be required.

 

Lee



#6 jforkner

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Posted 03 March 2024 - 06:23 PM

Can’t speak to Nikon, but my Canon 6D (I & II) recognizes a teleconverter in manual mode.  So no manual compensation is necessary.  If using live-view, WYSIWYG.

 

Jack



#7 robjme

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Posted 09 March 2024 - 01:12 PM

I am planning to travel to see the eclipse this year. 2017 was so remarkable and memorable that I can't wait to do it again. I had some success photographing the 2017 eclipse using my Nikon D90 through a C-8 telescope at F10. I should have used a focal reducer to get the entire disk in the photo, but I didn't. The three-minute totality experience went by so quickly and I was not fully prepared. I hope to do better next month.

This year I will use my D90 again through the AT80EDT at F6 shown in my avatar. I don't use a computer to observe, never have tried it. I need to get my equipment out and start rehearsing now. First, I need to do some research. I just went to mreclipse.com. Thank you mdredmond!

I would like to know:

What ISO and exposure times do you suggest? I will experiment sometime soon and take lee14's advice.

Should I make a lens cap with a small hole to reduce the aperture for solar viewing or use the 80MM? What size aperture would be best? 

Does it make sense to take some video shots for staking into a static image? I've never tried stacking before, and I don't know how to do it, but this might be a good time to learn. If so, what program should I use for processing?

I will definitely use complete manual mode. Any other camera setting suggestions?

 

TY to All


Edited by robjme, 09 March 2024 - 01:16 PM.

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#8 protonwrangler

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Posted 09 March 2024 - 07:42 PM

No specific knowledge of the D750, but even in the film camera days the autofocus lenses with the standard (then-current) teleconverters passed the change in aperture to the camera.

 

Mount that 300/2.8 alone and you can select f/2.8 -- mount it with the 2x and you can select f/5.6 as the widest aperture.  This would not apply with almost all of the manual focus lenses but I can only guess a rental lens would be autofocus.



#9 mdredmond

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Posted 10 March 2024 - 12:11 AM

What ISO and exposure times do you suggest? I will experiment sometime soon and take lee14's advice.
Should I make a lens cap with a small hole to reduce the aperture for solar viewing or use the 80MM? What size aperture would be best?
Does it make sense to take some video shots for staking into a static image? I've never tried stacking before, and I don't know how to do it, but this might be a good time to learn. If so, what program should I use for processing?
I will definitely use complete manual mode. Any other camera setting suggestions?

TY to All

Do not make such a cap. Buy or make a solar filter (I 3D printed mine). Take it off about 30 seconds before totality to get some diamond ring shots.

Use the chart on mreclipse. Bracket the hell out of exposure. Shoot at lowest native ISO and anything from f/4 to f/11 will be fine, just use exposure times on mreclipse. You do not need to change ISO or aperture during the entire thing. Just exposure time. Grab 1/4000 to 2 or more seconds. Repeatedly.

Then enjoy the eclipse. Don’t bury yourself in the camera.

If you can’t make or find a filter talk to me about suggestions for sources. Easiest is to 3D print one and make yourself. That’s what I’ve done in 2017 and now.

Edited by mdredmond, 10 March 2024 - 12:17 AM.


#10 Matt Lindsey

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Posted 10 March 2024 - 08:43 AM

I'm planning to shoot the eclipse with a Nikon D750 and a (rented) Nikkor 300mm f/2.8-22 lens and 2x Nikkor teleconverter. Apparently I'll lose two stops of aperture using the teleconverter.   

 

I have the exposure settings chart from mreclipse.com.  In it he suggests shutter speeds for various ISO and aperture combinations.

 

My question is:  Does the camera know about the teleconverter?  Or do I need to set aperture two stops lower than what I actually want?   For example if I'm going to use shutter speeds for f/8 should I set aperture on the camera to f/8 or instead to f/4 to account for the teleconverter?

 

I feel pretty stupid asking this but despite getting decent pics of the last eclipse, I'm *not* a photographer.

 

Thanks!

Yes, the camera will pick up sensors on the TC and adjust accordingly in any mode--and that includes Manual.  Both my NIKON D810 and D7500 pick up my 1.4 TC and give the correct f/#.  Haven't you tested this and seen the settings on the camera display?  You can also take test shots and look at the data set to confirm.   With a new camera and equipment, you will want to practice a lot before eclipse day, so you don't flail around with gear especially as totality arrives.

 

If you don't have the lens and TC yet, test them on the D750 at the camera store first and make sure everything reads correctly, especially if using an old 300mm.  


Edited by Matt Lindsey, 10 March 2024 - 09:46 AM.

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#11 mdredmond

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Posted 10 March 2024 - 12:14 PM

If you don't have the lens and TC yet, test them on the D750 at the camera store first and make sure everything reads correctly, especially if using an old 300mm.

Thanks!

I called Nikon and they said what you said. That the camera won’t even let me dial the aperture lower than 5.6 once the teleconverter is on and what the camera displays is what I’ll actually be at for aperture.

I can go into the rental place and test but haven’t. I did go in to test fit my solar filter but I won’t actually have real access to the lens until a couple of days before the eclipse. Unfortunate but it’s not super cheap (about $45/day) to rent. Renting for the next four weeks just isn’t an option.

This is such a long eclipse that there will be plenty of time to catch a ton of shots with wider bracketing so I’ll do that (with the laptop and Eclipse Maestro).

This will be fun! I need to practice daytime aligning my mount. I don’t want to screw with framing during totality and unfortunately my camera won’t do live view on the LCD while tethered.

I’m going to enjoy it and if I get good pics that’ll be a bonus. I’ll be on my first dad-daughter trip with my 16 year old kid and my focus is making sure she enjoys it.

Edited by mdredmond, 10 March 2024 - 11:30 PM.

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