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Broadband filter for bortle 5

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#1 No1umfan

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 01:09 PM

I live in rural countryside bortle 5 about 20 miles north of Toledo Ohio but no close neighbors and no street lights really not a lot of local light pollution. Wondering what my best choice would be for a broadband light pollution filter for a shooting galaxies. Have had what I Feel are some pretty good results with the optolong L ultimate for emission nebula 

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#2 Tapio

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 01:12 PM

For galaxies, no filter needed (or maybe just UV/IR if you are using optics with lenses).



#3 Andros246

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 01:12 PM

I live in rural countryside bortle 5 about 20 miles north of Toledo Ohio but no close neighbors and no street lights really not a lot of local light pollution. Wondering what my best choice would be for a broadband light pollution filter for a shooting galaxies. Have had what I Feel are some pretty good results with the optolong L ultimate for emission nebula 

Filter for galaxy under B5? No filter!

 

Unless you want to use the L-ultimate to pickup HA regions in said galaxies.



#4 No1umfan

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 01:38 PM

For galaxies, no filter needed (or maybe just UV/IR if you are using optics with lenses).

Do you mean like if I use my canon rf lenses with the R5??  If so do you have a recommendation?  Also when the Milky Way Galactic core is visible in my location, it’s usually in the south where I am pointing toward Toledo 20 miles away and there usually is some excessive horizon glow going on. That makes it difficult to get crisp images. Would a broadband filter work for that.



#5 Tapio

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 01:49 PM

Camera lenses and DSLR is another matter when considering filters.

You mentioned optolong L ultimate filter. Are you using clip in filter ?

Light pollution has become so broadband these days (because of LED lighting) that traditional light pollution filters have become obsolete.

It's either narrowband or no filter at all (apart from the mentioned UV/IR cut).

But luckily there are now prettty effective software tools to remove unwanted gradients from images.



#6 TerryD1

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 02:37 PM

I'm getting pretty good results with the Antlia Triband RGB Ultra Filter under Bortle 6-7 sky.  Antlia claims that's what they designed the filter to work well with broad band targets and I'm finding it works. 

 

Here's an example. https://www.astrobin.com/i820jf/


Edited by TerryD1, 28 February 2024 - 02:39 PM.


#7 danny1976

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Posted 28 February 2024 - 08:19 PM

Bortle 5 and galaxies no filter. The gradient extraction tools in Siril and PixInsight do an amazing job in subtracting the light pollution and you’re left with a very decent image to work with.

 

I did the test with a Optolong L-pro filter and sold it because it didn’t give me any benefits.


Edited by danny1976, 28 February 2024 - 08:20 PM.



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