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The classic eclipse gravity diagram is wrong.

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#1 gnowellsct

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Posted 09 April 2024 - 09:23 AM

I thought I would comment that in typical textbooks they will show a circle representing the Sun and a star behind the Sun. Then an arrow which bends around the Sun and is observed by a cartoon telescope on a cartoon Earth.

Actually the experiment can be thought of as trying to map the gravity well using a whole pattern of stars. Eddington mapped 14 stars in 1919. And the current project recently executed in Mexico might be able to compare several hundred thousand stars against the superb stellar positional atlases that have been made by satellite surveys and contain well over a billion stars.

One should be able to get a pretty cool diagram of the geometric distortion of space using all this data. You could probably do some kind of flip back and forth between the distorted positions of these thousands of stars and their regular mapped positions with no solar gravity well.

The Washington Post link below is a free link. It provides enough information to get a pretty good idea of the methodology.

https://wapo.st/3VNwwsD

Edited by gnowellsct, 09 April 2024 - 09:24 AM.

  • peter k, B 26354 and Barlowbill like this

#2 gnowellsct

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Posted 12 April 2024 - 04:31 PM

I don't know why this thread got moved into purgatory.  It is about the Eddington experiment and eclipses in general, not about the 2024 eclipse.





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