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What's the best Light Pollution filter for astophotography,

Astro Tech Astrophotography Beginner Cassegrain Celestron DIY DSLR Equipment Explore Scientific Filters
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6 replies to this topic

#1 thatDudeintherain

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Posted 19 April 2024 - 05:46 PM

Good Afternoon:

   I live in a city with a Bortle number of 8, approaching 9! My home has a yard and I'd like to do some astrophotography in my yard and not have to travel hours to a field and try to figure out the mount's orientation.  

 

To accomplish this, I would like to use a light pollution filter. So my question is, what is the best light pollution filter?

 

Thank you.



#2 jml79

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 01:08 AM

Wrong Forum ( I am sure a mod will move it) but, for high bortle the 3nm filters are best. The Optolong L-Ultimate is one and very popular. I am assuming you use a colour camera. If that prices shocks you SVBony and ZWO both make less expensive 7nm filters that seem to perform well. I have the IDAS NBZ but at 10nm and more expensive than some 7nm filters, it is likely not ideal for your location.



#3 GeorgeLiv

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Posted 20 April 2024 - 08:22 PM

There's no "best" filter for amateur imagers or observers. What we have instead are "compromise" filters that may or may NOT work for one or the other, or from city to city.

 

From your tags, I see that you want to image with some sort of a scope & DSLR, so if you stay in your city you're far better off with narrowband filters as opposed to LRGB or any broadband (including CLS) filters.

 

Starting from that advice, learn as much as you can about narrowband filters (one shot or for CCD?) and imaging with them (stacking, etc.). And above all, find out what your sky-glow looks like spectrally. Is it sodium based, LED or a mix of many sources?



#4 csrlice12

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Posted 27 April 2024 - 11:10 PM

The sun...it filters out all that background stuff so you can use a solar filter to see the sun.



#5 idclimber

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Posted 28 April 2024 - 12:05 AM

A tank of gasoline. 

 

These filters were made specifically for older lights like sodium that have been replaced by LED. Nobody is using those lights anymore because they are not energy efficient. They also looked like crap because of their narrow light spectrum. 

 

They still sell these filters and there are a few imagers who swear by them. What is missing is a direct comparison demonstrating an increase in SNR by using one. 

 

A mono camera with a full set of filters can and does help, especially narrowband.


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#6 17.5Dob

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Posted 28 April 2024 - 01:30 AM

No "light pollution filter" is going to help. The best you can do is to shoot narrowband, if you can't afford to drive to a dark site.
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#7 Sheridan

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Posted 28 April 2024 - 01:58 AM

Good Afternoon:

   I live in a city with a Bortle number of 8, approaching 9! My home has a yard and I'd like to do some astrophotography in my yard and not have to travel hours to a field and try to figure out the mount's orientation.  

 

To accomplish this, I would like to use a light pollution filter. So my question is, what is the best light pollution filter?

 

Thank you.

I use a UV/IR cut filter. I  also take alot of shorter exposures and never go over 120s. Normally 30-60s otherwise it gets washed out.




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