Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

First Time observing in Oregon - Rental suggestions and rattlesnakes?

Observing Visual
  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Vincent P

Vincent P

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2023
  • Loc: Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 19 May 2024 - 10:47 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I have been planning for a while a trip to Oregon, I live in Vancouver, Canada.

 

I was wondering if some of you have any recommendations for rentals?

I found a rental east of Portland, near Moro which seems perfect: Breaking Wind Lodge; the rental is on a bortle 2 zone which is perfect for DSO observing.
I did not find a lot of rentals recommandations around; I was looking at Airbnb with a light pollution map but it's more difficult than expected.

 

I know that going to Bend is better, but it would be a longer drive.

 

My second point: I have no experience regarding rattlesnakes and I have read some people mentioning snakes during night sessions... some post scared me a bit.

How common are those encounter at nights? I was just thinking about having some proper shoes and set up before dusk so I can inspect the area.


Thank you!

 


  • kenny moses likes this

#2 petert913

petert913

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,699
  • Joined: 27 May 2013
  • Loc: Silverton, OR

Posted 19 May 2024 - 10:59 PM

Breaking Wind Lodge is a great option.  Many members of the Portland Astronomy Club use it.  Comfy, safe, dark skies.  Snakes are rare in Moro and more scared of you than you are of them.


  • Diana N, kenny moses and Vincent P like this

#3 RalphMeisterTigerMan

RalphMeisterTigerMan

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,066
  • Joined: 01 Nov 2016

Posted 19 May 2024 - 11:18 PM

Fort Stevens is pretty good. Though, I think light pollution probably has made observing very challenging since I last I did any viewing there (1988).

 

As for Rattlesnake "rental", look arounf and I'm sure you can get some good deals. Some places charge by the hour, by the length of the snake or the number of snakes. Some even rent by the pound. 

Roadrunners are extra, of course.

 

Clear skies and keep looking up!

RalphMeisterTigerMan

 

*** NOTE *** No rattlesnakes or roadrunners, beep-beep, were harmed during the fliming of this post.


  • 12BH7 and Vincent P like this

#4 Vincent P

Vincent P

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2023
  • Loc: Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 19 May 2024 - 11:18 PM

Breaking Wind Lodge is a great option.  Many members of the Portland Astronomy Club use it.  Comfy, safe, dark skies.  Snakes are rare in Moro and more scared of you than you are of them.

I was surprised of not seeing any more review around, because it seemed so perfect and fairly priced.
Learning that an astronomy club is using it is probably one of the best feedback.

Thank you for the feedback and for reassuring me. 



#5 Jethro7

Jethro7

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,794
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2018
  • Loc: N.W. Florida

Posted 19 May 2024 - 11:37 PM

Hello everyone,

My second point: I have no experience regarding rattlesnakes and I have read some people mentioning snakes during night sessions... some post scared me a bit.

How common are those encounter at nights? I was just thinking about having some proper shoes and set up before dusk so I can inspect the area.

Hello Vincent,

I have a good bit of experience dealing with rattlesnakes. The one rule about rattlesnakes is, rattlesnakes won't go out of their way to bite you, unlike Water Moccasins. you have to work to get bitten by a rattlesnake. This includes not watching where you are stepping and stepping over logs and rocks or reaching under something with out looking first. Also if you are camping with tents or sleeping under the stars in bed roles when it is cold out, rattlesnakes will snuggle up under your tent or bed role for warmth, so take care and move slow when you get up morning. I just leave then alone but every now and again I do find the need to do a catch and release. 

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

 

P.S. By the way, rattlesnake eyes shine bright red at night when hit with a light.


Edited by Jethro7, 19 May 2024 - 11:45 PM.

  • siriusandthepup, mountain monk, Diana N and 2 others like this

#6 mountain monk

mountain monk

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,612
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2009
  • Loc: Jackson, Wyoming

Posted 20 May 2024 - 09:19 AM

Rattlesnakes are not active below 50 degrees or above 100 degrees. I don’t know what the temps are where you are observing, but act accordingly. If you are within their active temperature range, the you might consider wearing knee-high rubber boots since most bites are on the lower leg. Fewer than ten people die in the U.S. every year from snakebite, so assuming you have reasonable access to medical treatment, you will be fine. I wouldn’t worry about it very much.

 

Enjoy your trip!

 

Dark skies.

 

Jack


  • payner, Diana N, 12BH7 and 1 other like this

#7 SporadicGazer

SporadicGazer

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 965
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2023
  • Loc: SF Bay Area, CA, USA

Posted 20 May 2024 - 11:20 AM

The rattlesnake safety instruction we got on a recent tour in Arizona and New Mexico was to never put your hands or feet anywhere you can't see.

 

Rattlesnakes don't want to deal with you and will only bite if they feel cornered or attacked, so if you don't reach up onto their ledge or step over things into their nest you won't see or interact with them.

 

All this matches my California desert instruction (from decades ago.)


  • payner, mountain monk, Diana N and 1 other like this

#8 Forward Scatter

Forward Scatter

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,090
  • Joined: 22 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Wandering the PNW

Posted 20 May 2024 - 12:38 PM

Our local rattlers are pretty timid and mellow, sort of like most Oregonians, unlike those nasty diamondbacks with the same girth as Popeye's forearm we had in the Sierra foothills when I was growing up.

 

One is more likely to get pooped on by a bald eagle than run into a rattler here. 

 

However, we do have a lot of cool garter snakes!


  • mountain monk, Diana N, Vincent P and 1 other like this

#9 TonyInHonduras

TonyInHonduras

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 64
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2021
  • Loc: Latitude 14.5 (be jealous!) Tegucigalpa,Honduras

Posted 20 May 2024 - 01:39 PM

"Breaking Wind" Lodge? Really? Marketing couldn't come up with another less gastro-challenged name? I'm sure it's got great skies but the "atmosphere"???
  • JOEinCO, WillR and ColonelPanic like this

#10 mountain monk

mountain monk

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,612
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2009
  • Loc: Jackson, Wyoming

Posted 20 May 2024 - 02:40 PM

In California, western diamondbacks are only found in the southern deserts along the border with Arizona. They can indeed get big, they are aggressive, and, most notably, they do not retreat, which is why they are used to teach dogs to avoid rattlesnakes. Most rattlesnakes if confronted with a dog will try to get away. The Pacific rattlesnake is smaller and less aggressive and would be the one encountered in Oregon. We are fortunate in the U.S. not to have to deal with kraits, cobras, Russell’s vipers, saw-scaled vipers, or those horrifying things in Australia. Be nice to rattlesnakes!

 

Dark skies.

 

Jack


  • payner, Diana N, linuxizer and 2 others like this

#11 payner

payner

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,873
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2007
  • Loc: Kentucky

Posted 20 May 2024 - 06:38 PM

I was on a dirt road in the long leaf pine woods of NW Florida some years ago. We came to a halt as a large, beautiful eastern diamondback was going across the one lane trail. It seemed to go on forever (its head had already passed) before we could proceed. I was amazed at the circumference of its body. Truly, reminded me of the Incredible Hulk’s arms. 
I worked around water moccasins regularly (occasionally still do) and never had one make me feel threatened but the juveniles; I watched when around them as they would posture from their disdain for our presence, understandably. Snakes in my part of the country that are aggressive are black racers; they may chase someone and scare the unaware to death, but they are non-venomous. 


  • mountain monk and Vincent P like this

#12 preprius

preprius

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 256
  • Joined: 04 Sep 2022

Posted 20 May 2024 - 07:08 PM

well you won't be worried about mojave green rattle snakes.  They have a nasty bite of poisons. 



#13 mountain monk

mountain monk

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,612
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2009
  • Loc: Jackson, Wyoming

Posted 20 May 2024 - 07:46 PM

If I may since in my fifteen years here I’ve seen many posts about snakes…

 

The best reference is my second edition of the Navy’s Venomous Snakes of the World. It covers in detail 600 species divided into the six regions of U.S. military operations. The introductory material covers snake bites and treatment. The issue is far more complex than you would think, with the variety of venoms, amounts delivered for a bite, etc. Because of our wars in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan, not to mention others, our knowledge of venomous snakes has radically increased, and so has the variety of treatments. There are a multitude of venomous snakes in every state but Maine. Rather gripping bedtime reading!

 

Dark skies.

 

Jack


  • payner likes this

#14 Vincent P

Vincent P

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2023
  • Loc: Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 20 May 2024 - 11:24 PM

Thank you all for feedback and your tips/advices.

 

It's going to happen then, I will observe there and stay away from sleepy and shy rattlesnakes!


Edited by Vincent P, 20 May 2024 - 11:25 PM.

  • payner, mountain monk, Forward Scatter and 1 other like this

#15 Observer1980

Observer1980

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 68
  • Joined: 11 Nov 2021

Posted 23 May 2024 - 01:01 PM

Just get yourself some cowboy boots.



#16 Forward Scatter

Forward Scatter

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,090
  • Joined: 22 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Wandering the PNW

Posted 25 May 2024 - 10:07 AM

About the most dangerous thing we have here in Oregon is the brain-eating amoeba that can be found in some of the hot springs.

 

Before I forget.....We do have the town of Boring, Oregon here on the way towards Mt Hood from PDX. A rather apt metaphor. 


Edited by Forward Scatter, 25 May 2024 - 10:26 AM.

  • Vincent P likes this

#17 12BH7

12BH7

    Soyuz

  • -----
  • Posts: 3,803
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2022
  • Loc: North of Phoenix Arizona

Posted 25 May 2024 - 10:39 AM

Rattlesnakes are not active below 50 degrees or above 100 degrees. I don’t know what the temps are where you are observing, but act accordingly. If you are within their active temperature range, the you might consider wearing knee-high rubber boots since most bites are on the lower leg. Fewer than ten people die in the U.S. every year from snakebite, so assuming you have reasonable access to medical treatment, you will be fine. I wouldn’t worry about it very much.

 

Enjoy your trip!

 

Dark skies.

 

Jack

Here in Arizona we are knee deep in rattlers. In the last 40 or more years we've had only two deaths. And both of those were people messing with the snake. Leave it alone and it will leave you alone. Besides, they will let you know WELL in advance that you're bothering them.

 

Also, rattlers are very confrontational. Unlike most other snakes, rattlers will coil and hold there ground. So just move away and let them pass. 



#18 csrlice12

csrlice12

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 34,286
  • Joined: 22 May 2012
  • Loc: Denver, CO

Posted 25 May 2024 - 01:07 PM

Even more rare than Oregon Rattlesnakes are Oregon Clear Skies.....


  • Forward Scatter and 12BH7 like this

#19 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 23,517
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: New Lebanon, NY and Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 25 May 2024 - 02:56 PM

Even more rare than Oregon Rattlesnakes are Oregon Clear Skies.....

Not in eastern Oregon during the summer.


  • FoxIslandHiker likes this

#20 mountain monk

mountain monk

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,612
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2009
  • Loc: Jackson, Wyoming

Posted 25 May 2024 - 06:02 PM

True, though it should also be mentioned, given the OP’s subject, that there are a heck of a lot more rattlesnakes in eastern, and particularly south eastern, Oregon. 
 

Dark skies.

 

Jack


  • Vincent P likes this

#21 Forward Scatter

Forward Scatter

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,090
  • Joined: 22 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Wandering the PNW

Posted 27 May 2024 - 09:46 AM

One of the best things about central & eastern Oregon is that in addition to dark skies, the landscape and geology, combined with amazing hiking, make for an absolutely incredible experience. 

 

And then there is the issue that we have no state sales tax! It allows us to buy up to 10% more astro gear compared to Washington or California!


  • ngc6352 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Observing, Visual



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics