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Help a beginner in amateur spectroscopy

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#1 abdullahskyhunter

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Posted 15 June 2024 - 02:43 PM

Hello everyone,
I have been doing planetary astrophotography for a few years and decided to take a step and start learning spectroscopy. I am asked to investigate a research question with an independent and dependent variable suitable for my 8-9 bortles sky and equipment: 127slt, ZWO ASI 120, and a Star Analzyer.

 

What I have currently is “How do the temperatures calculated from the spectra of stars compare to the accepted values found in literature? I wanted to analyze the spectra of the stars using Rspec, identifying their type and approximating their temperature. However, this research is not possible without relying on internet data since my only variable is the spectrum.

 

Would you suggest a solid research question that will be a good starter for me to get into amateur spectroscopy while also doable considering my conditions?
Thank you so much!



#2 Foc

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Posted 19 June 2024 - 01:40 AM

What about t-CrB spectrum over time?  Time being the independent variable.  Thats assuming your research question grants you enough time for it to do something dramatic like blowing up. There are also stars that vary in their spectrum over time. But you may want to join a spectroscopy group if you have not done much spectroscopy.

 

The RSpec site (home of your star analyzer)  has a number of possible activities on it and some useful links


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#3 abdullahskyhunter

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Posted 19 June 2024 - 05:50 AM

What about t-CrB spectrum over time?  Time being the independent variable.  Thats assuming your research question grants you enough time for it to do something dramatic like blowing up. There are also stars that vary in their spectrum over time. But you may want to join a spectroscopy group if you have not done much spectroscopy.

 

The RSpec site (home of your star analyzer)  has a number of possible activities on it and some useful links

Thanks for your comment! 
Do you think I would be able to measure any changes in the spectrum in the span of two months? Because this is the time I have for data collection.
Would you suggest any spectroscopy groups as well?


Edited by abdullahskyhunter, 19 June 2024 - 05:50 AM.


#4 Foc

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Posted 19 June 2024 - 07:24 AM

Two months should see some small changes in many stars if your spectra are precise enough, but that depends on seeing and technique. All new techniques take time and different individuals progress at different rates. The RSpec site ( under the samples menu) suggests monitoring changes in RR Lyrae over just a few hours and using a 4 inch refractor, if you have access to that star that sounds the easiest and most foolproof starting project. You could additionally monitor a comet or try that supernova as well. The links menu includes a few 'experts,

#5 robin_astro

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Posted 20 June 2024 - 11:45 AM

 

 

The RSpec site (home of your star analyzer)  has a number of possible activities on it and some useful links

Note the RSpec website is not the "home of the Star Analyser". (note the correct spelling)  It was developed by me in 2005 and is manufactured and sold by Paton Hawksley Education in the UK. Tom Field, the author of Rspec  software sells it in the US along with his software but it is available from many other dealers around the world. (Almost 8000 have been sold)

 

Cheers

Robin


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#6 robin_astro

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Posted 20 June 2024 - 11:53 AM

What about t-CrB spectrum over time? 

T CrB is about mag 11 currently so likely to be faint for this setup using an uncooled colour camera  in light polluted skies. The changes in the spectrum pre outburst in any case are very subtle (changes in the intensity of Hydrogen emission lines) which would not be detectable in spectra using this set up.  Once it goes into outburst it will of course be a very interesting bright target for a week or two but when it will happen is completely unpredictable and could be tomorrow or as much as a year or two away

 

Cheers

Robin



#7 Xilman

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Posted 21 June 2024 - 07:29 AM

Hello everyone,
I have been doing planetary astrophotography for a few years and decided to take a step and start learning spectroscopy. I am asked to investigate a research question with an independent and dependent variable suitable for my 8-9 bortles sky and equipment: 127slt, ZWO ASI 120, and a Star Analzyer.

 

What I have currently is “How do the temperatures calculated from the spectra of stars compare to the accepted values found in literature? I wanted to analyze the spectra of the stars using Rspec, identifying their type and approximating their temperature. However, this research is not possible without relying on internet data since my only variable is the spectrum.

 

Would you suggest a solid research question that will be a good starter for me to get into amateur spectroscopy while also doable considering my conditions?
Thank you so much!

The Sun is nice and bright. It is also very variable at the moment, with enormous active areas.So: how does the intensity of various spectral regions vary with time and how well correlated are they with the visual features?

 

Just a thought ...




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