Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Noctilucent and the Clouds

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 yuzameh

yuzameh

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2,761
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2022

Posted 20 June 2024 - 09:42 PM

I know, sounds like a sixties pop group.

 

It's that time of year again, in fact has been for a little while, for those of us residing in the Hemisphere Northern, especially the more northerer of us.

 

There used to a site that's long gone that was somewhat European in its patronage (maybe North Americans on the whole just are North enough?).

 

A more obscure one I eventually found after a gap of a few years turned out to be

 

http://ed-co.net/nlcnet/

 

Go to latest sightings, postiive reports, and currently June.

 

From the reported locations you can see how far south folk are picking them up.

 

Or it'll help you confirm that you did see one if you haven't seen one before.

 

Here in the UK Scotland fares best, but reports can come in as far south as kent.

 

They make a change, just remember to look towards where the Sun will rise if you are doing a long nighter in these Solsticial times after you've finished and packed away, especially if you are in an area that's North enough to be deprived of astronomical twilight for a month or three.

 

They are a somewhat strange cross between electric blue and mother of pearl blue.

 

And when they are a good set of wavey ones quite distinct from bits of cirrus or contrails that are just catching the rays of the still hidden Sun (the aforementioned colour difference also helps).

 

They're mesospheric, and they do seem to have increased a bit in the past couple of years, or at least given more spectacular shows at times.

 

Whether that's the sheer amount of rockets being thrown up nowadays or Solar Maximum, or whatever (the ice crystals need something to seed upon, I believe it is something like the classical supersaturated solution case, but I've been wrong afore, and I promise to be wrong again), it doesn't stop you seeing 'em.


  • PKDfan and Dobs O Fun like this

#2 jrkorman

jrkorman

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 153
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2018
  • Loc: Rule, TX, USA

Posted 21 June 2024 - 12:07 AM

An other possible source - we did have a relatively recent volcanic eruption that pushed dust well into the stratosphere. That could migrate upwards.



#3 Rutilus

Rutilus

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,768
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2010

Posted 21 June 2024 - 01:57 AM

Here in the UK Scotland fares best, but reports can come in as far south as kent.

 

They make a change, just remember to look towards where the Sun will rise if you are doing a long nighter in these Solsticial times after you've finished and packed away, especially if you are in an area that's North enough to be deprived of astronomical twilight for a month or three.

 

 

Had a nice display on the morning of the 18th. Observed from the Midlands U.K. looking East.

I posted the images here in the camera forum,  https://www.cloudyni...-clouds/page-13.

 

On most images of the Noctilucent clouds the star Capella can be seen in the images when using a

wide angle lens. I often start the night off by looking in that area to see if there is any activity.



#4 Rutilus

Rutilus

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,768
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2010

Posted 21 June 2024 - 02:01 AM

An other possible source - we did have a relatively recent volcanic eruption that pushed dust well into the stratosphere. That could migrate upwards.

I have somewhere on a USB stick an image that I took of both Volcanic dust from the Sarychev  (Russia) Volcano

eruption and Noctilucent cloud that was taken from the U.K. back in the year 2009.


Edited by Rutilus, 21 June 2024 - 02:02 AM.


#5 EsaT

EsaT

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 960
  • Joined: 27 Sep 2022
  • Loc: Finland 61.6N

Posted 21 June 2024 - 02:57 AM

especially the more northerer of us.

Sorry but you don't live north, if you can see noctilucent clouds right now.

In actual north we could read newspaper outside at midnight.

 

 

Light of noctilucent clouds show significant polarization making polarized sunglasses good quick test.

 

 

 

 

I have somewhere on a USB stick an image that I took of both Volcanic dust from the Sarychev  (Russia) Volcano

eruption and Noctilucent cloud that was taken from the U.K. back in the year 2009.

Noctilucent clouds are made by ice crystals and not dust.

Though dust particles can help water to condense and big volcanic eruptions can send water above tropopause.

 

 

Like Hunga Tonga, which happened at just the optimal depth to blow up lots of water into air.

At lower depth eruption would have been less wet and at higher depth pressure would have fast "muffled" explosiveness.

https://www.jpl.nasa...to-stratosphere

 

Though it affected mostly southern hemisphere:

https://www.pnas.org...pnas.2301994120



#6 Rutilus

Rutilus

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,768
  • Joined: 17 Dec 2010

Posted 21 June 2024 - 03:33 AM

Sorry but you don't live north, if you can see noctilucent clouds right now.

In actual north we could read newspaper outside at midnight.

 

 

Light of noctilucent clouds show significant polarization making polarized sunglasses good quick test.

 

 

 

 

Noctilucent clouds are made by ice crystals and not dust.

Though dust particles can help water to condense and big volcanic eruptions can send water above tropopause.

 

 

Like Hunga Tonga, which happened at just the optimal depth to blow up lots of water into air.

At lower depth eruption would have been less wet and at higher depth pressure would have fast "muffled" explosiveness.

https://www.jpl.nasa...to-stratosphere

 

Though it affected mostly southern hemisphere:

https://www.pnas.org...pnas.2301994120

"Noctilucent clouds are made by ice crystals and not dust". - Yes I'm aware of that fact. The volcanic dust and Noctilucent

cloud appear differently on an image.

 

"Sorry but you don't live north, if you can see noctilucent clouds right now.

In actual north we could read newspaper outside at midnight." -  I've lived and worked at 60.5N and have seen images

taken at that latitude of Noctilucent clouds. No doubt the further North you go makes things harder.



#7 yuzameh

yuzameh

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 2,761
  • Joined: 13 Dec 2022

Posted 21 June 2024 - 12:45 PM

Had a nice display on the morning of the 18th. Observed from the Midlands U.K. looking East.

I posted the images here in the camera forum,  https://www.cloudyni...-clouds/page-13.

 

On most images of the Noctilucent clouds the star Capella can be seen in the images when using a

wide angle lens. I often start the night off by looking in that area to see if there is any activity.

That was one massive display!  I missed it (cloudy here).  I saw that event on the nlcnet place yesterday.

 

Stared this am got nothing.

 

Didn't know there was a thread, but I don't often usually look at the camera ones.  In fact I often don't login (which may seem ironic given how much wittering I do some days) which reduces the number of fora visible.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics