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Today's sun in Ha had it all!

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9 replies to this topic

#1 gstrumol

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 02:02 PM

Even though over half of the disk was basically blank, this morning's sun in Ha had plenty to see: a huge thick filament that looked like a Jalapeno pepper, a filaprom, a large loop prominence, and almost directly opposite it a 90o bent prominence. Seeing was so so, but the PST/DSLR tried their best:

 

at1.jpg

(click to enlarge)

 

and here are some zoomed in shots:

 

at2.jpg

(click to enlarge)

 

with that nice loop in full view.


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#2 GSteve

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 02:05 PM

Nice, Thanks for sharing! I'm still clouded over in my part of the world so next opportunity will be next weekend for me.


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#3 Astrojensen

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 02:08 PM

Yeah, there was a lot of stuff to look at today. The loop prominences were awesome in my 63mm Zeiss + Quark! 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


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#4 hornjs

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 05:12 PM

Great captures Gary!


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#5 gstrumol

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 05:24 PM

Nice, Thanks for sharing! I'm still clouded over in my part of the world so next opportunity will be next weekend for me.

 

Yeah, there was a lot of stuff to look at today. The loop prominences were awesome in my 63mm Zeiss + Quark! 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark

 

Great captures Gary!

Thanks guys! The proms claimed the day for sure.


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#6 rigel123

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 08:41 PM

Nice ones Gary, glad you were able to catch those post flare loops, they were amazing!


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#7 gstrumol

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Posted 24 June 2024 - 09:01 PM

Thanks Warren! I was surprised to see them pop up


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#8 Luna-tic

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Posted 25 June 2024 - 08:20 PM

I know next to nothing about solar observing or photography beyond what I got in the 2017 eclipse. What would I get, using a Baader film light reduction filter (gives an orange color) over my objective and used a Ha filter in my eyepiece? Scope shouldn't matter, but it would be an 8" Edge HD.



#9 gstrumol

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Posted 25 June 2024 - 09:04 PM

I know next to nothing about solar observing or photography beyond what I got in the 2017 eclipse. What would I get, using a Baader film light reduction filter (gives an orange color) over my objective and used a Ha filter in my eyepiece? Scope shouldn't matter, but it would be an 8" Edge HD.

Ok, you're mixing apples and oranges.

 

For white light viewing (seeing sunspots) you would need a front mounted solar film on the 8" SCT. Good news: the sun's color will be natural white, not orange. Bad news: unless you have really good seeing conditions an 8" SCT is actually a disadvantage. You're much better off with a refractor in the 80-150mm aperture range.

 

For Ha viewing you either need a dedicated Ha scope or getting a Quark.


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#10 rigel123

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Posted 26 June 2024 - 07:29 AM

As Gary mentions, the Ha filter you are thinking of is for DSO imaging and will do nothing for you with regards to viewing the sun, except make the image dimmer.


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