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Astronomy for children resources

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#1 badjao

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 06:31 PM

I'm looking for suggestions for books\star maps\astronomy guides etc. for my grandchildren as a hopefully enticing introduction to all things astronomy related.

 

I myself am a neophyte so need all the help I can get bigblush.gif.

 

My grandchildren are aged 7 and 8 years, both have good minds, such that I would not be averse to taxing their abilities a little.

 

If you have any suggested reading or reference materials etc. it will be really appreciated.

 

I am planning our first sky watching night in March and hoping for clear skys in the Galloway Dark Sky Park.

 

 

  Thank you.

 

   John

 



#2 DLuders

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 07:18 PM

I highly recommend "Find the Constellations" book by H.A. Rey (the same author as the "Curious George" books).  It has very good diagrams showing the Constellation shapes; they are so good that they're offered in the free planetarium software program http://stellarium.org .   smile.gif

 

You can find gently-used versions of "Find the Constellations" book on eBay. 


Edited by DLuders, 15 January 2020 - 07:19 PM.

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#3 DLuders

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 07:22 PM

I like David Fuller's "Eyes on the Sky" videos   https://www.youtube....kyDOTcom/videos   .  They are well-produced and use Stellarium to demonstrate the planetarium-view of the heavens.   waytogo.gif 


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#4 NearVision

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 08:13 PM

Last year our club gave away some binoculars in our annual sky scavenger hunt for kids and included this book by Greg Babcock. "Stargazing For Everyone With Binoculars"

It's very nicely laid out and has a simple way of explaining things without making it too childish. The general consensus in the club was that it was a nice simple beginner's guide focused on binoculars for kids but still very usable with a telescope or by adults. It keeps the math and heavy science simple enough to understand.


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#5 B 26354

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 09:03 PM

Last year our club gave away some binoculars in our annual sky scavenger hunt for kids and included this book by Greg Babcock. "Stargazing For Everyone With Binoculars"

It's very nicely laid out and has a simple way of explaining things without making it too childish. The general consensus in the club was that it was a nice simple beginner's guide focused on binoculars for kids but still very usable with a telescope or by adults. It keeps the math and heavy science simple enough to understand.

Stargazing for Everyone with Binoculars - By Greg Babcock

 

This spiral-bound book appears to be exclusive to Cloud Break Optics, in Seattle WA. Neither the book nor its author appear on Amazon.

 

https://cloudbreakop...with-binoculars


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#6 M57Guy

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 10:11 PM

For Christmas, I bought this book for my 10 year old who shows interest and routinely joins me for views when I'm in the backyard with a scope.

 

https://www.amazon.c...7MKJ5XMSJKW9FP1

 

Were about half way through and its quality time together as we take turns reading pages to each other.

 

Suggested age range is 7 to 13. Its a good introduction, in my opinion.

 

Good luck!


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#7 badjao

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 05:21 PM

Thank you to all of you for your great suggestions.

 

Can I ask if I am right in thinking I should purchase a Planisphere as opposed to starting the young ones off with an app?

 

If so, can you recommend a Planisphere.

 

Preferably durable, my two grandchildren (boys) would no doubt decide an alternative use for one in a moment of playfulness, a frisbee perhaps whee.gifsmile.png  .

 

Thank you.

 

John
 



#8 B 26354

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 06:15 PM

Depending on your latitude, either of these is excellent. I use the large 30° one, and also keep the small version in my RASC handbook, as an easy reference when planning future observing sessions.

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B005J0XTH2/

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B005J0XSUA/


Edited by B 26354, 16 January 2020 - 06:16 PM.

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#9 B 26354

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Posted 16 January 2020 - 06:45 PM

By the way... a book which I find preferable to H.A. Rey's Find the Constellations, is his The Stars, which I used shortly after its first publication in 1954, when I was ten. The newest edition is excellent:

 

https://www.amazon.c...uct/0544763440/


Edited by B 26354, 16 January 2020 - 06:46 PM.

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#10 Tfer

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 01:32 AM

A little late to this conversation, but when my daughter was 10, we looked for stars that were about 75 light years away.

 

My Mom passed away in 2015, so we found stars where the light left at the same time my mother (her grandmother) was born.

 

That ignited a fire in her, that still burns today...


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#11 badjao

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 03:21 PM

A little late to this conversation, but when my daughter was 10, we looked for stars that were about 75 light years away.

 

My Mom passed away in 2015, so we found stars where the light left at the same time my mother (her grandmother) was born.

 

That ignited a fire in her, that still burns today...

I really like that, what a great way to give such relevance to a child as an introduction to astronomy, thank you.


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#12 bigdob24

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 08:48 AM

If the kids have an IOS device look at ‘Sky View” .

Its great for anyone that’s interested in finding things in the night sky.

Ive been in astronomy for over 30 yrs and use it for quick ID.

There is a free version you can look at but for a small amount maybe $5 bucks you can get the full version that I recommend. 
You turn it on and point at an object in the sky and it will identify stars, planets and a few deep sky. Even works in the day time .

It uses the camera so you see where your pointing.

Its a keeper for me

BD


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